Modeling signal propagation in the human cochlea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The level-dependent component of the latency of human auditory brainstem responses (ABR) to tonebursts decreases by about 38% for every 20-dB increase in stimulus level over a wide range of both frequency and level [Neely, Norton, Gorga, and Jesteadt (1998). J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 31, 87-97]. This level-dependence has now been simulated in an active, nonlinear, transmission-line model of cochlear mechanics combined with an adaptation stage. The micromechanics in this model are similar to previous models except that a dual role is proposed for the tectorial membrane (TM): (1) passive sharpening the tuning of sensory-cell inputs (relative to basilar-membrane vibrations) and (2) providing an optimal phase shift (relative to basilar-membrane vibrations) of outer-hair-cell feedback forces, so that amplification is restricted to a limited range of frequencies. The adaptation stage, which represents synaptic adaptation of neural signals, contributes to the latency level-dependence more at low frequencies than at high frequencies. Compression in this model spans the range of audible sound levels with a compression ratio of about 2:1. With further development, the proposed model of cochlear micromechanics could be useful both (1) as a front-end to functional models of the auditory system and (2) as a foundation for understanding the physiological basis of cochlear amplification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2155-2167
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume142
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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cochlea
propagation
micromechanics
membranes
vibration
compression ratio
hair
cells
stimuli
transmission lines
Modeling
Cochlea
phase shift
tuning
low frequencies
acoustics
Membrane

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Modeling signal propagation in the human cochlea. / Neely, Stephen T; Rasetshwane, Daniel M.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 142, No. 4, 01.10.2017, p. 2155-2167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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