Miniature in vivo cameras for use in single-incision robotic surgery

Nathan D. Otten, Shane M Farritor, Amy C. Lehman, Tyler D. Wortman, Ryan L. McCormick, Eric Markvicka, Dmitry Oleynikov

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Single-incision surgery provides numerous benefits over traditional open and laparoscopic surgery techniques including reduced pain, shortened recovery times, and minimal tissue scarring. The use of miniature in vivo robots inserted through a single incision offers additional advantages over conventional laparoscopy in improved maneuverability and dexterity. One consequence of performing surgical procedures through a small single incision is the loss of direct visualization through a large open incision or visualization via laparoscopic cameras inserted through additional ports. For this reason, a miniature in vivo actuated camera was designed to pass through a single incision and attach to a miniature in vivo robot, providing live video feedback at the control of the surgeon. The device was tested in a lab setting and porcine model surgery and demonstrated successful movement, control, and high-quality visualization, indicating the device's functionality and feasibility for use in single-incision robotic surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011
Pages154-159
Number of pages6
StatePublished - Jul 11 2011
Event48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011 - Denver, CO, United States
Duration: Apr 15 2011Apr 17 2011

Publication series

Name48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011

Conference

Conference48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011
CountryUnited States
CityDenver, CO
Period4/15/114/17/11

Fingerprint

Surgery
Visualization
Cameras
Laparoscopy
Robots
Maneuverability
Tissue
Feedback
Recovery
Robotic surgery

Keywords

  • Camera
  • In vivo
  • Miniature
  • Minimally invasive
  • Robotic surgery
  • Single-incision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Otten, N. D., Farritor, S. M., Lehman, A. C., Wortman, T. D., McCormick, R. L., Markvicka, E., & Oleynikov, D. (2011). Miniature in vivo cameras for use in single-incision robotic surgery. In 48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011 (pp. 154-159). (48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011).

Miniature in vivo cameras for use in single-incision robotic surgery. / Otten, Nathan D.; Farritor, Shane M; Lehman, Amy C.; Wortman, Tyler D.; McCormick, Ryan L.; Markvicka, Eric; Oleynikov, Dmitry.

48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011. 2011. p. 154-159 (48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Otten, ND, Farritor, SM, Lehman, AC, Wortman, TD, McCormick, RL, Markvicka, E & Oleynikov, D 2011, Miniature in vivo cameras for use in single-incision robotic surgery. in 48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011. 48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011, pp. 154-159, 48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011, Denver, CO, United States, 4/15/11.
Otten ND, Farritor SM, Lehman AC, Wortman TD, McCormick RL, Markvicka E et al. Miniature in vivo cameras for use in single-incision robotic surgery. In 48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011. 2011. p. 154-159. (48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011).
Otten, Nathan D. ; Farritor, Shane M ; Lehman, Amy C. ; Wortman, Tyler D. ; McCormick, Ryan L. ; Markvicka, Eric ; Oleynikov, Dmitry. / Miniature in vivo cameras for use in single-incision robotic surgery. 48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011. 2011. pp. 154-159 (48th Annual Rocky Mountain Bioengineering Symposium and 48th International ISA Biomedical Sciences Instrumentation Symposium 2011).
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