MicroRNAs as therapeutic targets for cancer

Guofeng Cheng, Michael Danquah, Ram I. Mahato

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a recently discovered family of endogenous, non-coding RNA molecules approximately 22 nt in length [1]. They negatively modulate gene expression post-transcriptionally by binding to the complementary sequence in the 3′ untranslated region of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) [1]. miRNAs are transcribed from genomic DNA by RNA polymerase II but not further translated into protein (non-coding RNA). Eventually, they are processed from primary transcripts known as pri-miRNAs to short stem-loop structures called pre-miRNA and finally to become functionally mature miRNA. Mature miRNA molecules are partially complimentary to target mRNA where they either repress translation or direct destructive cleavage [2]. The first miRNA was described in 1993 by Lee and colleagues, who found miRNA-lin-4 is essential for the normal temporal control of diverse post-embryonic development in Caenorhabditis elegans by negatively regulating the level of LIN-14 protein via antisense RNA-RNA interaction [3]. miRNAs have a large-scale effect as a new layer of gene regulation mechanism. It has been estimated that the vertebrate genome encodes up to 1000 unique miRNAs, which can regulate expression of at least 30% of genes [4,5].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPharmaceutical Perspectives of Cancer Therapeutics
PublisherSpringer US
Pages441-474
Number of pages34
ISBN (Print)9781441901309
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2009

Fingerprint

MicroRNAs
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Untranslated RNA
Gene expression
Genes
DNA Polymerase II
Antisense RNA
Messenger RNA
Molecules
RNA Polymerase II
Caenorhabditis elegans
3' Untranslated Regions
Embryonic Development
Vertebrates
Genome
RNA
Gene Expression
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Cheng, G., Danquah, M., & Mahato, R. I. (2009). MicroRNAs as therapeutic targets for cancer. In Pharmaceutical Perspectives of Cancer Therapeutics (pp. 441-474). Springer US. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0131-6_14

MicroRNAs as therapeutic targets for cancer. / Cheng, Guofeng; Danquah, Michael; Mahato, Ram I.

Pharmaceutical Perspectives of Cancer Therapeutics. Springer US, 2009. p. 441-474.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cheng, G, Danquah, M & Mahato, RI 2009, MicroRNAs as therapeutic targets for cancer. in Pharmaceutical Perspectives of Cancer Therapeutics. Springer US, pp. 441-474. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0131-6_14
Cheng G, Danquah M, Mahato RI. MicroRNAs as therapeutic targets for cancer. In Pharmaceutical Perspectives of Cancer Therapeutics. Springer US. 2009. p. 441-474 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0131-6_14
Cheng, Guofeng ; Danquah, Michael ; Mahato, Ram I. / MicroRNAs as therapeutic targets for cancer. Pharmaceutical Perspectives of Cancer Therapeutics. Springer US, 2009. pp. 441-474
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