Microfluidic device architecture for electrochemical patterning and detection of multiple DNA sequences

Elizabeth Pavlovic, Rebecca Y. Lai, Ting Ting Wu, Brian S. Ferguson, Ren Sun, Kevin W. Plaxco, H. T. Soh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electrochemical biosensors pose an attractive solution for point-of-care diagnostics because they require minimal instrumentation and they are scalable and readily integrated with microelectronics. The integration of electrochemical biosensors with microscale devices has, however, proven to be challenging due to significant incompatibilities among biomolecular stability, operation conditions of electrochemical sensors, and microfabrication techniques. Toward a solution to this problem, we have demonstrated here an electrochemical array architecture that supports the following processes in situ, within a self-enclosed microfluidic device; (a) electrode cleaning and preparation, (b) electrochemical addressing, patterning, and immobilization of sensing biomolecules at selected sensor pixels, (c) sequence-specific electrochemical detection from multiple pixels, and (d) regeneration of the sensing pixels. The architecture we have developed is general, and it should be applicable to a wide range of biosensing schemes that utilize gold-thiol self-assembled monolayer chemistry. As a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate the detection and differentiation of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons diagnostic of human (H1N1) and avian (H5N1) influenza.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1102-1107
Number of pages6
JournalLangmuir
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 5 2008

Fingerprint

microfluidic devices
DNA sequences
Microfluidics
deoxyribonucleic acid
Pixels
Biosensors
pixels
bioinstrumentation
Electrochemical sensors
Microfabrication
Polymerase chain reaction
Biomolecules
Self assembled monolayers
influenza
Sulfhydryl Compounds
Microelectronics
polymerase chain reaction
Gold
incompatibility
Cleaning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Spectroscopy
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

Pavlovic, E., Lai, R. Y., Wu, T. T., Ferguson, B. S., Sun, R., Plaxco, K. W., & Soh, H. T. (2008). Microfluidic device architecture for electrochemical patterning and detection of multiple DNA sequences. Langmuir, 24(3), 1102-1107. https://doi.org/10.1021/la702681c

Microfluidic device architecture for electrochemical patterning and detection of multiple DNA sequences. / Pavlovic, Elizabeth; Lai, Rebecca Y.; Wu, Ting Ting; Ferguson, Brian S.; Sun, Ren; Plaxco, Kevin W.; Soh, H. T.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 24, No. 3, 05.02.2008, p. 1102-1107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pavlovic, E, Lai, RY, Wu, TT, Ferguson, BS, Sun, R, Plaxco, KW & Soh, HT 2008, 'Microfluidic device architecture for electrochemical patterning and detection of multiple DNA sequences', Langmuir, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 1102-1107. https://doi.org/10.1021/la702681c
Pavlovic, Elizabeth ; Lai, Rebecca Y. ; Wu, Ting Ting ; Ferguson, Brian S. ; Sun, Ren ; Plaxco, Kevin W. ; Soh, H. T. / Microfluidic device architecture for electrochemical patterning and detection of multiple DNA sequences. In: Langmuir. 2008 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 1102-1107.
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