Mental and physical workloads in a competitive laparoscopic skills training environment: A pilot study

Denny Yu, Amro M. Abdelrahman, Eeeln H. Buckarma, Bethany R Lowndes, Becca L. Gas, Eric J. Finnesgard, Jad M. Abdelsattar, T. K. Pandian, Moustafa El Khatib, David R. Farley, Susan Hallbeck

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surgical trainees undergo demanding training to achieve high surgical task proficiency. Abounding clinical and educational responsibilities mandate efficient and effective training. This research measured resident workload during laparoscopic skills training to identify excessive workload and how workload impacted task performance. Twenty-eight surgical trainees performed a standardized surgical training task and completed a workload questionnaire while observers measured physiological stress, posture risk assessment, and task performance. Participants self-reported mental demands, physical demands, temporal demands, performance, effort, and frustration. Effort (12±4) and frustration (12±5) were the highest subscales while physical demand (8±4) was the lowest. All participants were observed performing the task in at-risk postures, with 21% exhibiting risk levels requiring immediate intervention. Physical demand was associated with posture risk assessment scores (p<0.05). Mental demand was positively (R2=0.20, p<0.05) and frustration was negatively (R2=0.18, p<0.05) associated with skin conductance range. A point increase in physical demand was associated with a six second increase in performance time (β=6.0, p=0.01). These results support the fact that human factors and ergonomic tools can be used to relate surgical skills performance with workload, stress, and posture risks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages508-512
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289470
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
Event59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Los Angeles, United States
Duration: Oct 26 2015Oct 30 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2015-January
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period10/26/1510/30/15

Fingerprint

workload
Risk assessment
frustration
demand
performance
trainee
risk assessment
Ergonomics
Human engineering
Skin
ergonomics
resident
responsibility
questionnaire

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Yu, D., Abdelrahman, A. M., Buckarma, E. H., Lowndes, B. R., Gas, B. L., Finnesgard, E. J., ... Hallbeck, S. (2015). Mental and physical workloads in a competitive laparoscopic skills training environment: A pilot study. In 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015 (pp. 508-512). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2015-January). Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931215591109

Mental and physical workloads in a competitive laparoscopic skills training environment : A pilot study. / Yu, Denny; Abdelrahman, Amro M.; Buckarma, Eeeln H.; Lowndes, Bethany R; Gas, Becca L.; Finnesgard, Eric J.; Abdelsattar, Jad M.; Pandian, T. K.; El Khatib, Moustafa; Farley, David R.; Hallbeck, Susan.

2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015. Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., 2015. p. 508-512 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2015-January).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yu, D, Abdelrahman, AM, Buckarma, EH, Lowndes, BR, Gas, BL, Finnesgard, EJ, Abdelsattar, JM, Pandian, TK, El Khatib, M, Farley, DR & Hallbeck, S 2015, Mental and physical workloads in a competitive laparoscopic skills training environment: A pilot study. in 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, vol. 2015-January, Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., pp. 508-512, 59th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014, Los Angeles, United States, 10/26/15. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931215591109
Yu D, Abdelrahman AM, Buckarma EH, Lowndes BR, Gas BL, Finnesgard EJ et al. Mental and physical workloads in a competitive laparoscopic skills training environment: A pilot study. In 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015. Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc. 2015. p. 508-512. (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society). https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931215591109
Yu, Denny ; Abdelrahman, Amro M. ; Buckarma, Eeeln H. ; Lowndes, Bethany R ; Gas, Becca L. ; Finnesgard, Eric J. ; Abdelsattar, Jad M. ; Pandian, T. K. ; El Khatib, Moustafa ; Farley, David R. ; Hallbeck, Susan. / Mental and physical workloads in a competitive laparoscopic skills training environment : A pilot study. 2015 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2015. Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc., 2015. pp. 508-512 (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).
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