Memory and language in aging: How their shared cognitive processes, neural correlates, and supporting mechanisms change with age

David E Warren, Rachael Rubin, Samantha Shune, Melissa C. Duff

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter summarizes cognitive aging findings focused on memory abilities, and addresses language abilities. It presents several relevant theories of cognitive aging that are applicable to the study of memory, language, or both. The chapter describes the taxonomy of memory to illustrate the organization of human memory systems. It also describes two distinct types of memory (declarative and non-declarative), the brain regions and networks that support these types of memory, and the way these brain systems change over the lifespan with a focus on age-related memory changes in older adults. The chapter explains how language processes and the brain regions that support them are affected by age. It concludes by discussing the promise of studies probing the intersections of memory and language through behavior, neuropsychology, and neuroimaging which point toward possible shared mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Wiley Handbook on the Aging Mind and Brain
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Pages270-295
Number of pages26
ISBN (Electronic)9781118772034
ISBN (Print)9781118771778
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 20 2017

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Keywords

  • Human memory systems
  • Language processes
  • Neuroimaging
  • Neuropsychology
  • Older adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Warren, D. E., Rubin, R., Shune, S., & Duff, M. C. (2017). Memory and language in aging: How their shared cognitive processes, neural correlates, and supporting mechanisms change with age. In The Wiley Handbook on the Aging Mind and Brain (pp. 270-295). Wiley-Blackwell. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781118772034.ch14