Medical malpractice and head and neck cancer

Daniel D. Lydiatt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of review: The purpose of this review is to evaluate medical malpractice involving patients with head and neck cancer. In the United States, problems associated with the medical malpractice environment are reaching proportions that threaten the delivery of health care. Recent findings: Several methods to learn more about the trends and ramifications of litigation have been developed. Although patients with cancer of the head and neck bring suits rarely, when they do several themes seem prevalent. Delays in diagnosis are common allegations. Plaintiffs are frequently much younger than expected, and the oncologic outcome is frequently poor. Defendant physicians occasionally unwittingly add to the delay by not expecting the younger patient. The poor oncologic outcome may be related to the delay or to a biologically more aggressive disease. Relationships between these factors are explored. Consent issues are also relatively common. Summary: Physicians must strive to know as much as possible about tort reform, and to contribute to the process. Litigation analysis and other tools to expand our understanding can be used to educate ourselves and the legal community. Scientific standards must be developed along with clinical pathways to guide ourselves to prevent litigation. They may also guide the legal community to establish more rational standards of care based on a consensus of expert opinions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-75
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Opinion in Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2004

Fingerprint

Malpractice
Jurisprudence
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Physicians
Legal Liability
Critical Pathways
Expert Testimony
Standard of Care
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Delays
  • Head and neck cancer
  • Litigation
  • Medical malpractice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Medical malpractice and head and neck cancer. / Lydiatt, Daniel D.

In: Current Opinion in Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 12, No. 2, 01.04.2004, p. 71-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{7d5a37d13bae4970a7b280fca901b2ed,
title = "Medical malpractice and head and neck cancer",
abstract = "Purpose of review: The purpose of this review is to evaluate medical malpractice involving patients with head and neck cancer. In the United States, problems associated with the medical malpractice environment are reaching proportions that threaten the delivery of health care. Recent findings: Several methods to learn more about the trends and ramifications of litigation have been developed. Although patients with cancer of the head and neck bring suits rarely, when they do several themes seem prevalent. Delays in diagnosis are common allegations. Plaintiffs are frequently much younger than expected, and the oncologic outcome is frequently poor. Defendant physicians occasionally unwittingly add to the delay by not expecting the younger patient. The poor oncologic outcome may be related to the delay or to a biologically more aggressive disease. Relationships between these factors are explored. Consent issues are also relatively common. Summary: Physicians must strive to know as much as possible about tort reform, and to contribute to the process. Litigation analysis and other tools to expand our understanding can be used to educate ourselves and the legal community. Scientific standards must be developed along with clinical pathways to guide ourselves to prevent litigation. They may also guide the legal community to establish more rational standards of care based on a consensus of expert opinions.",
keywords = "Delays, Head and neck cancer, Litigation, Medical malpractice",
author = "Lydiatt, {Daniel D.}",
year = "2004",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00020840-200404000-00003",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "71--75",
journal = "Current Opinion in Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery",
issn = "1068-9508",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Medical malpractice and head and neck cancer

AU - Lydiatt, Daniel D.

PY - 2004/4/1

Y1 - 2004/4/1

N2 - Purpose of review: The purpose of this review is to evaluate medical malpractice involving patients with head and neck cancer. In the United States, problems associated with the medical malpractice environment are reaching proportions that threaten the delivery of health care. Recent findings: Several methods to learn more about the trends and ramifications of litigation have been developed. Although patients with cancer of the head and neck bring suits rarely, when they do several themes seem prevalent. Delays in diagnosis are common allegations. Plaintiffs are frequently much younger than expected, and the oncologic outcome is frequently poor. Defendant physicians occasionally unwittingly add to the delay by not expecting the younger patient. The poor oncologic outcome may be related to the delay or to a biologically more aggressive disease. Relationships between these factors are explored. Consent issues are also relatively common. Summary: Physicians must strive to know as much as possible about tort reform, and to contribute to the process. Litigation analysis and other tools to expand our understanding can be used to educate ourselves and the legal community. Scientific standards must be developed along with clinical pathways to guide ourselves to prevent litigation. They may also guide the legal community to establish more rational standards of care based on a consensus of expert opinions.

AB - Purpose of review: The purpose of this review is to evaluate medical malpractice involving patients with head and neck cancer. In the United States, problems associated with the medical malpractice environment are reaching proportions that threaten the delivery of health care. Recent findings: Several methods to learn more about the trends and ramifications of litigation have been developed. Although patients with cancer of the head and neck bring suits rarely, when they do several themes seem prevalent. Delays in diagnosis are common allegations. Plaintiffs are frequently much younger than expected, and the oncologic outcome is frequently poor. Defendant physicians occasionally unwittingly add to the delay by not expecting the younger patient. The poor oncologic outcome may be related to the delay or to a biologically more aggressive disease. Relationships between these factors are explored. Consent issues are also relatively common. Summary: Physicians must strive to know as much as possible about tort reform, and to contribute to the process. Litigation analysis and other tools to expand our understanding can be used to educate ourselves and the legal community. Scientific standards must be developed along with clinical pathways to guide ourselves to prevent litigation. They may also guide the legal community to establish more rational standards of care based on a consensus of expert opinions.

KW - Delays

KW - Head and neck cancer

KW - Litigation

KW - Medical malpractice

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=1842590612&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=1842590612&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00020840-200404000-00003

DO - 10.1097/00020840-200404000-00003

M3 - Review article

C2 - 15167040

AN - SCOPUS:1842590612

VL - 12

SP - 71

EP - 75

JO - Current Opinion in Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery

JF - Current Opinion in Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery

SN - 1068-9508

IS - 2

ER -