Media Health Literacy (MHL)

Development and measurement of the concept among adolescents

Diane Levin-Zamir, Dafna Lemish, Rosa Gofin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Increasing media use among adolescents and its significant influence on health behavior warrants in-depth understanding of their response to media content. This study developed the concept and tested a model of Media Health Literacy (MHL), examined its association with personal/socio-demographic determinants and reported sources of health information, while analyzing its role in promoting empowerment and health behavior (cigarette/water-pipe smoking, nutritional/dieting habits, physical/sedentary activity, safety/injury behaviors and sexual behavior). The school-based study included a representative sample of 1316 Israeli adolescents, grades 7, 9 and 11, using qualitative and quantitative instruments to develop the new measure.The results showed that the MHL measure is highly scalable (0.80) includes four sequenced categories: identification/recognition, critical evaluation of health content in media, perceived influence on adolescents and intended action/reaction. Multivariate analysis showed that MHL was significantly higher among girls (β = 1.25, P < 0.001), adolescents whose mothers had higher education (β = 0.16, P = 0.04), who report more adult/interpersonal sources of health information (β = 0.23, P < 0.01) and was positively associated with health empowerment (β = 0.36, P < 0.0005) and health behavior (β = 0.03, P = 0.05). The findings suggest that as a determinant of adolescent health behavior, MHL identifies groups at risk and may provide a basis for health promotion among youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-335
Number of pages13
JournalHealth Education Research
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

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Health Literacy
Health Behavior
literacy
adolescent
health behavior
health
Health
health information
Adolescent Behavior
empowerment
Health Promotion
determinants
Tobacco Products
Sexual Behavior
Habits
Multivariate Analysis
Smoking
Mothers
Demography
Exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Media Health Literacy (MHL) : Development and measurement of the concept among adolescents. / Levin-Zamir, Diane; Lemish, Dafna; Gofin, Rosa.

In: Health Education Research, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.04.2011, p. 323-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levin-Zamir, Diane ; Lemish, Dafna ; Gofin, Rosa. / Media Health Literacy (MHL) : Development and measurement of the concept among adolescents. In: Health Education Research. 2011 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 323-335.
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