Mechanisms of gene transcriptional regulation through biotin and biotin-binding proteins in mammals

Janos Zempleni, Dandan Liu, Daniel Camara Teixeira, Mahendra P. Singh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Mammals cannot synthesize biotin and depend on a regular dietary supply of this water-soluble vitamin (Zempleni et al., 2009). The Adequate Intake for biotin in adults is 30 µg/d (National Research Council, 1998). The classical role of biotin in mammalian intermediary metabolism is to serve as a covalently bound coenzyme in five carboxylases (Zempleni et al., 2009). Both the cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) and the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) catalyze the binding of bicarbonate to acetyl-CoA to generate malonyl-CoA, but the two isoforms have distinct functions in intermediary metabolism (Kim et al., 1997). ACC1 produces malonyl-CoA for the synthesis of fatty acid synthesis in the cytoplasm; ACC2 is an important regulator of fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria. The malonyl-CoA produced by ACC2 inhibits mitochondrial uptake of fatty acids for Β-oxidation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationVitamin-Binding Proteins
Subtitle of host publicationFunctional Consequences
PublisherCRC Press
Pages219-228
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781439880203
ISBN (Print)9781439880166
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

biotin-binding proteins
Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase
acetyl-CoA carboxylase
Mammals
biotin
Biotin
Fatty acids
malonyl coenzyme A
Gene expression
Malonyl Coenzyme A
mammals
Metabolism
beta oxidation
Fatty Acids
Genes
Coenzymes
Oxidation
Mitochondria
genes
Vitamins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Zempleni, J., Liu, D., Teixeira, D. C., & Singh, M. P. (2013). Mechanisms of gene transcriptional regulation through biotin and biotin-binding proteins in mammals. In Vitamin-Binding Proteins: Functional Consequences (pp. 219-228). CRC Press. https://doi.org/10.1201/b15313

Mechanisms of gene transcriptional regulation through biotin and biotin-binding proteins in mammals. / Zempleni, Janos; Liu, Dandan; Teixeira, Daniel Camara; Singh, Mahendra P.

Vitamin-Binding Proteins: Functional Consequences. CRC Press, 2013. p. 219-228.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Zempleni, J, Liu, D, Teixeira, DC & Singh, MP 2013, Mechanisms of gene transcriptional regulation through biotin and biotin-binding proteins in mammals. in Vitamin-Binding Proteins: Functional Consequences. CRC Press, pp. 219-228. https://doi.org/10.1201/b15313
Zempleni J, Liu D, Teixeira DC, Singh MP. Mechanisms of gene transcriptional regulation through biotin and biotin-binding proteins in mammals. In Vitamin-Binding Proteins: Functional Consequences. CRC Press. 2013. p. 219-228 https://doi.org/10.1201/b15313
Zempleni, Janos ; Liu, Dandan ; Teixeira, Daniel Camara ; Singh, Mahendra P. / Mechanisms of gene transcriptional regulation through biotin and biotin-binding proteins in mammals. Vitamin-Binding Proteins: Functional Consequences. CRC Press, 2013. pp. 219-228
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