Mechanism underlying mechanical dysfunction in the border zone of left ventricular aneurysm

A finite element model study

Julius M. Guccione, Scott M. Moonly, Pavlos Moustakidis, Kevin D. Costa, Michael J Moulton, Mark B. Ratcliffe, Michael K. Pasque

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. The global left ventricular dysfunction characteristic of left ventricular aneurysm is associated with muscle fiber stretching in the adjacent noninfarcted (border zone) region during isovolumic systole. The mechanism of this regional dysfunction is poorly understood. Methods. An anteroapical transmural myocardial infarct was created by coronary arterial ligation in an adult Dorset sheep and was allowed to mature into left ventricular aneurysm for 10 weeks. The animal was imaged subsequently using magnetic resonance imaging with simultaneous recording of intraventricular pressures. A realistic mathematical model of the three-dimensional ovine left ventricle with an anteroapical aneurysm was constructed from multiple short-axis and long-axis magnetic resonance imaging slices at the beginning of diastolic filling. Results. Three model simulations are presented: (1) normal border zone contractility and normal aneurysmal material properties; (2) greatly reduced border zone contractility (by 50%) and normal aneurysmal material properties; and (3) greatly reduced border zone contractility (by 50%) and stiffened aneurysmal material properties (by 1000%). Only the latter two simulations were able to reproduce experimentally observed stretching of border zone fibers during isovolumic systole. Conclusions. The mechanism underlying mechanical dysfunction in the border zone region of left ventricular aneurysm is primarily the result of myocardial contractile dysfunction rather than increased wall stress in this region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)654-662
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume71
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Aneurysm
Systole
Sheep
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Ventricular Pressure
Heart Ventricles
Ligation
Theoretical Models
Myocardial Infarction
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Mechanism underlying mechanical dysfunction in the border zone of left ventricular aneurysm : A finite element model study. / Guccione, Julius M.; Moonly, Scott M.; Moustakidis, Pavlos; Costa, Kevin D.; Moulton, Michael J; Ratcliffe, Mark B.; Pasque, Michael K.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 71, No. 2, 01.01.2001, p. 654-662.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guccione, Julius M. ; Moonly, Scott M. ; Moustakidis, Pavlos ; Costa, Kevin D. ; Moulton, Michael J ; Ratcliffe, Mark B. ; Pasque, Michael K. / Mechanism underlying mechanical dysfunction in the border zone of left ventricular aneurysm : A finite element model study. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2001 ; Vol. 71, No. 2. pp. 654-662.
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