Measuring sound-processor thresholds for pediatric cochlear implant recipients using visual reinforcement audiometry via telepractice

Michelle L Hughes, Jenny L. Goehring, Joshua D. Sevier, Sangsook Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: The goal of this study was to test the feasibility of using telepractice for measuring behavioral thresholds (T levels) in young children with cochlear implants (CIs) using visual reinforcement audiometry (VRA). Specifically, we examined whether there were significant differences in T levels, test time, or measurement success rate between in-person and remote test conditions. Method: Data were collected for 17 children, aged 1.1–3.4 years. A within-subject AB-BA (A, in-person; B, remote) study design was used, with data collection typically occurring over 2 visits. T levels were measured during each test session using VRA for one basal, middle, and apical electrode. Two additional outcome measures included test time and response success rate, the latter of which was calculated as the ratio of the number of electrode thresholds successfully measured versus attempted. All 3 outcome measures were compared between the in-person and remote sessions. Last, a parent/caregiver questionnaire was administered at the end of the study to evaluate subjective aspects of remote versus traditional CI programming. Results: Results showed no significant difference in T levels between in-person and remote test conditions. There were also no significant differences in test time or measurement success rate between the two conditions. The questionnaires indicated that 82% of parents or caregivers would use telepractice for routine CI programming visits some or all of the time if the option was available. Conclusion: Results from this study suggest that telepractice can be used successfully to set T levels for young children with CIs using VRA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2115-2125
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Volume61
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

Fingerprint

audiometry
Audiometry
Cochlear Implants
reinforcement
recipient
Pediatrics
Caregivers
Electrodes
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
human being
caregiver
parents
programming
Parents
questionnaire
Reinforcement (Psychology)
Sound
Reinforcement
Recipient
Cochlear Implant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Measuring sound-processor thresholds for pediatric cochlear implant recipients using visual reinforcement audiometry via telepractice. / Hughes, Michelle L; Goehring, Jenny L.; Sevier, Joshua D.; Choi, Sangsook.

In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Vol. 61, No. 8, 01.08.2018, p. 2115-2125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hughes, Michelle L ; Goehring, Jenny L. ; Sevier, Joshua D. ; Choi, Sangsook. / Measuring sound-processor thresholds for pediatric cochlear implant recipients using visual reinforcement audiometry via telepractice. In: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research. 2018 ; Vol. 61, No. 8. pp. 2115-2125.
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