Maternal immune activation alters fetal brain development through interleukin-6

Stephen E.P. Smith, Jennifer Li, Krassimira Garbett, Karoly Mirnics, Paul H. Patterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

752 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Schizophrenia and autism are thought to result from the interaction between a susceptibility genotype and environmental risk factors. The offspring of women who experience infection while pregnant have an increased risk for these disorders. Maternal immune activation (MIA) in pregnant rodents produces offspring with abnormalities in behavior, histology, and gene expression that are reminiscent of schizophrenia and autism, making MIA a useful model of the disorders. However, the mechanism by which MIA causes long-term behavioral deficits in the offspring is unknown. Here we show that the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) is critical for mediating the behavioral and transcriptional changes in the offspring. A single maternal injection of IL-6 on day 12.5 of mouse pregnancy causes prepulse inhibition (PPI) and latent inhibition (LI) deficits in the adult offspring. Moreover, coadministration of an anti-IL-6 antibody in the poly(I:C) model of MIA prevents the PPI, LI, and exploratory and social deficits caused by poly(I:C) and normalizes the associated changes in gene expression in the brains of adult offspring. Finally, MIA in IL-6 knock-out mice does not result in several of the behavioral changes seen in the offspring of wild-type mice after MIA. The identification of IL-6 as a key intermediary should aid in the molecular dissection of the pathways whereby MIA alters fetal brain development, which can shed new light on the pathophysiological mechanisms that predispose to schizophrenia and autism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)10695-10702
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume27
Issue number40
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2007

Fingerprint

Fetal Development
Interleukin-6
Mothers
Brain
Autistic Disorder
Schizophrenia
Adult Children
Gene Expression
Knockout Mice
Dissection
Rodentia
Histology
Genotype
Cytokines
Pregnancy
Injections
Antibodies
Infection

Keywords

  • Autism
  • Cytokine
  • IL-6
  • Influenza
  • Maternal immune activation
  • Poly(I:C)
  • Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Maternal immune activation alters fetal brain development through interleukin-6. / Smith, Stephen E.P.; Li, Jennifer; Garbett, Krassimira; Mirnics, Karoly; Patterson, Paul H.

In: Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 27, No. 40, 03.10.2007, p. 10695-10702.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, Stephen E.P. ; Li, Jennifer ; Garbett, Krassimira ; Mirnics, Karoly ; Patterson, Paul H. / Maternal immune activation alters fetal brain development through interleukin-6. In: Journal of Neuroscience. 2007 ; Vol. 27, No. 40. pp. 10695-10702.
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