Maternal Health-Seeking on Behalf of Low-Income Children

Katherine Kaiser, Teresa Barry Hultquist, Li-Wu Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Women receiving Medicaid account for almost one-third of the childbearing population in the United States, an extensive investment for federal and state governments. Gaps and conflicting research results exist that explain/predict maternal health-seeking behavior for vulnerable children. Public health nurses (PHN) need evidence to design interventions that improve maternal health-seeking and child health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine factors: maternal (key influences), child, and household that contribute to maternal health-seeking behavior. Methods: The design was a descriptive, correlational, longitudinal study (n = 1,141 mother-child dyads). Results: Children were more likely to receive preventive medical care if they had a medical condition (OR: 1.60, p < .01) and had access to private transportation (OR: 1.49, p < .05). Children of married mothers (OR: 1.51, p < .01) and access to private transportation (OR: 1.47, p < .05) received more preventive dental care. African-American mothers (OR: 0.61, p < .01) and mothers with higher self-reported health status (OR: 0.84, p < .05) sought less illness-related medical child health services (CHS). Conclusion: Maternal health-seeking behavior in low-income households is complex. Predictors may depend on whether care is preventive or illness-related, medical, or dental. Further study should clarify what factors predict what type of CHS use to better specify PHN interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-31
Number of pages11
JournalPublic Health Nursing
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Mothers
Preventive Medicine
Child Health Services
Public Health Nurses
State Government
Federal Government
Dental Care
Medicaid
Child Behavior
African Americans
Health Status
Longitudinal Studies
Tooth
Maternal Health
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Child health
  • Prevention
  • Self-rated health
  • Women's health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Maternal Health-Seeking on Behalf of Low-Income Children. / Kaiser, Katherine; Barry Hultquist, Teresa; Chen, Li-Wu.

In: Public Health Nursing, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 21-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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