MASD part 2

Incontinence-associated dermatitis and intertriginous dermatitis: A consensus

Joyce Marie Black, Mikel Gray, Donna Z. Bliss, Karen L. Kennedy-Evans, Susan Logan, Mona M. Baharestani, Janice C. Colwell, Margaret Goldberg, Catherine R. Ratliff

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A consensus panel was convened to review current knowledge of moisture-associated skin damage (MASD) and to provide recommendations for prevention and management. This article provides a summary of the discussion and the recommendations in regards to 2 types of MASD: incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) and intertriginous dermatitis (ITD). A focused history and physical assessment are essential for diagnosing IAD or ITD and distinguishing these forms of skin damage from other types of skin damage. Panel members recommend cleansing, moisturizing, and applying a skin protectant to skin affected by IAD and to the perineal skin of persons with urinary or fecal incontinence deemed at risk for IAD. Prevention and treatment of ITD includes measures to ensure that skin folds are dry and free from friction; however, panel members do not recommend use of bed linens, paper towels, or dressings for separating skin folds. Individuals with ITD are at risk for fungal and bacterial infections and these infections should be treated appropriately; for example, candidal infections should be treated with antifungal therapies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-370
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

Fingerprint

Dermatitis
Skin
Fecal Incontinence
Friction
Mycoses
Urinary Incontinence
Bandages
Infection
Bacterial Infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medical–Surgical
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

MASD part 2 : Incontinence-associated dermatitis and intertriginous dermatitis: A consensus. / Black, Joyce Marie; Gray, Mikel; Bliss, Donna Z.; Kennedy-Evans, Karen L.; Logan, Susan; Baharestani, Mona M.; Colwell, Janice C.; Goldberg, Margaret; Ratliff, Catherine R.

In: Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing, Vol. 38, No. 4, 01.07.2011, p. 359-370.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Black, JM, Gray, M, Bliss, DZ, Kennedy-Evans, KL, Logan, S, Baharestani, MM, Colwell, JC, Goldberg, M & Ratliff, CR 2011, 'MASD part 2: Incontinence-associated dermatitis and intertriginous dermatitis: A consensus', Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing, vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 359-370. https://doi.org/10.1097/WON.0b013e31822272d9
Black, Joyce Marie ; Gray, Mikel ; Bliss, Donna Z. ; Kennedy-Evans, Karen L. ; Logan, Susan ; Baharestani, Mona M. ; Colwell, Janice C. ; Goldberg, Margaret ; Ratliff, Catherine R. / MASD part 2 : Incontinence-associated dermatitis and intertriginous dermatitis: A consensus. In: Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing. 2011 ; Vol. 38, No. 4. pp. 359-370.
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