Abstract

Although mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is considered a distinctive disease entity within non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), the cytology and growth pattern of MCL can be quite variable and the clinical significance of these features is unclear. Also, the role of anthracyclines in the management of MCL is unclear. Therefore, we examined our experience with MCL in an effort to clarify these important issues. We identified 68 patients with MCL who were evaluated clinically and treated by the Nebraska Lymphoma Study Group. Treatment consisted of combination chemotherapy containing an anthracycline in 76% of the patients. The cases were grouped by blastic or lymphocytic cytology, and the latter were divided by growth pattern into nodular (or mantle-zone) and diffuse types. The clinical and pathological variables were then evaluated for their prognostic value. The median overall survival (OS) and failure-free survival (FFS) for the entire group were 38 months and 12 months, respectively, and there was no survival advantage for those who received an anthracycline. The cases were grouped as follows: blastic type, 26%; nodular lymphocytic type, 44%; and diffuse lymphocytic type, 30%. Both the cytology and pattern of growth were predictive of OS and FFS. The median OS was as follows: blastic type, 55 months; nodular lymphocytic type, 50 months; and diffuse lymphocytic type, 16 months (P = 0.0038). The clinical features that predicted for a shorter survival included bone marrow involvement, advanced stage disease, B symptoms, a poor performance score, and the International Prognostic Index. We conclude that new therapeutic approaches, with the patients stratified by histologic type and clinical prognostic factors, are clearly needed for MCL. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)190-196
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Hematology
Volume64
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 6 2000

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Mantle-Cell Lymphoma
Lymphoma
Survival
Anthracyclines
Cell Biology
Growth
Combination Drug Therapy
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Bone Marrow
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Anthracycline
  • Mantle cell lymphoma
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Mantle cell lymphoma. A clinicopathologic study of 68 cases from the Nebraska Lymphoma Study Group. / Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Vose, Julie Marie; Greiner, Timothy Charles; Lynch, James C.; Chan, Wing C.; Bierman, Philip Jay; Dave, Bhavana J; Sanger, Warren G.; Armitage, James Olen.

In: American Journal of Hematology, Vol. 64, No. 3, 06.07.2000, p. 190-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Although mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is considered a distinctive disease entity within non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), the cytology and growth pattern of MCL can be quite variable and the clinical significance of these features is unclear. Also, the role of anthracyclines in the management of MCL is unclear. Therefore, we examined our experience with MCL in an effort to clarify these important issues. We identified 68 patients with MCL who were evaluated clinically and treated by the Nebraska Lymphoma Study Group. Treatment consisted of combination chemotherapy containing an anthracycline in 76{\%} of the patients. The cases were grouped by blastic or lymphocytic cytology, and the latter were divided by growth pattern into nodular (or mantle-zone) and diffuse types. The clinical and pathological variables were then evaluated for their prognostic value. The median overall survival (OS) and failure-free survival (FFS) for the entire group were 38 months and 12 months, respectively, and there was no survival advantage for those who received an anthracycline. The cases were grouped as follows: blastic type, 26{\%}; nodular lymphocytic type, 44{\%}; and diffuse lymphocytic type, 30{\%}. Both the cytology and pattern of growth were predictive of OS and FFS. The median OS was as follows: blastic type, 55 months; nodular lymphocytic type, 50 months; and diffuse lymphocytic type, 16 months (P = 0.0038). The clinical features that predicted for a shorter survival included bone marrow involvement, advanced stage disease, B symptoms, a poor performance score, and the International Prognostic Index. We conclude that new therapeutic approaches, with the patients stratified by histologic type and clinical prognostic factors, are clearly needed for MCL. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.",
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AU - Chan, Wing C.

AU - Bierman, Philip Jay

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AU - Armitage, James Olen

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AB - Although mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is considered a distinctive disease entity within non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), the cytology and growth pattern of MCL can be quite variable and the clinical significance of these features is unclear. Also, the role of anthracyclines in the management of MCL is unclear. Therefore, we examined our experience with MCL in an effort to clarify these important issues. We identified 68 patients with MCL who were evaluated clinically and treated by the Nebraska Lymphoma Study Group. Treatment consisted of combination chemotherapy containing an anthracycline in 76% of the patients. The cases were grouped by blastic or lymphocytic cytology, and the latter were divided by growth pattern into nodular (or mantle-zone) and diffuse types. The clinical and pathological variables were then evaluated for their prognostic value. The median overall survival (OS) and failure-free survival (FFS) for the entire group were 38 months and 12 months, respectively, and there was no survival advantage for those who received an anthracycline. The cases were grouped as follows: blastic type, 26%; nodular lymphocytic type, 44%; and diffuse lymphocytic type, 30%. Both the cytology and pattern of growth were predictive of OS and FFS. The median OS was as follows: blastic type, 55 months; nodular lymphocytic type, 50 months; and diffuse lymphocytic type, 16 months (P = 0.0038). The clinical features that predicted for a shorter survival included bone marrow involvement, advanced stage disease, B symptoms, a poor performance score, and the International Prognostic Index. We conclude that new therapeutic approaches, with the patients stratified by histologic type and clinical prognostic factors, are clearly needed for MCL. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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