Making the invisible visible

Shining a light on gender and sexuality in courses primarily focused on other topics

Kelsy C Burke, Alexa Trumpy

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Instructors often wish to address gender and sexuality in a wide variety of courses. Yet concerns regarding how to productively intertwine these topics with other class material while remaining attentive to feminist and queer concerns may lead to hesitation. We discuss two of the most frequent challenges that arise when discussing gender and sexuality in courses primarily focused on other topics. These challenges are related to (1) class materials that reinforce a gender binary and (2) students’ denial of gender and sexual privilege. We then demonstrate how highlighting exceptions to predominant social patterns and incorporating intersectionality in class readings and discussions can address these stumbling blocks. We conclude with a discussion of the proposed solutions help instructors present gender and sexual disparities in a critical and complex manner without being defeatist.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTeaching Gender and Sex in Contemporary America
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages273-280
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9783319303642
ISBN (Print)9783319303628
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

sexuality
gender
instructor
intersectionality
privilege
present
student

Keywords

  • Course design
  • Gender
  • Intersectionality
  • Sexuality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Burke, K. C., & Trumpy, A. (2016). Making the invisible visible: Shining a light on gender and sexuality in courses primarily focused on other topics. In Teaching Gender and Sex in Contemporary America (pp. 273-280). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-30364-2_27

Making the invisible visible : Shining a light on gender and sexuality in courses primarily focused on other topics. / Burke, Kelsy C; Trumpy, Alexa.

Teaching Gender and Sex in Contemporary America. Springer International Publishing, 2016. p. 273-280.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Burke, KC & Trumpy, A 2016, Making the invisible visible: Shining a light on gender and sexuality in courses primarily focused on other topics. in Teaching Gender and Sex in Contemporary America. Springer International Publishing, pp. 273-280. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-30364-2_27
Burke KC, Trumpy A. Making the invisible visible: Shining a light on gender and sexuality in courses primarily focused on other topics. In Teaching Gender and Sex in Contemporary America. Springer International Publishing. 2016. p. 273-280 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-30364-2_27
Burke, Kelsy C ; Trumpy, Alexa. / Making the invisible visible : Shining a light on gender and sexuality in courses primarily focused on other topics. Teaching Gender and Sex in Contemporary America. Springer International Publishing, 2016. pp. 273-280
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