Magnetic resonance imaging of folic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles reflects tissue biodistribution of long-acting antiretroviral therapy

Tianyuzi Li, Howard Eliot Gendelman, Gang Zhang, Pavan Puligujja, JoEllyn M McMillan, Tatiana K Bronich, Benson J Edagwa, Xin Ming Liu, Michael D. Boska

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regimen adherence, systemic toxicities, and limited drug penetrance to viral reservoirs are obstacles limiting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our laboratory’s development of the monocyte-macrophage-targeted long-acting nanoformulated ART (nanoART) carriage provides a novel opportunity to simplify drug-dosing regimens. Progress has nonetheless been slowed by cumbersome, but required, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution testing. To this end, we developed a small magnetite ART (SMART) nanoparticle platform to assess antiretroviral drug tissue biodistribution and PK using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Herein, we have taken this technique a signifcant step further by determining nanoART PK with folic acid (FA) decorated magnetite (ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide [USPIO]) particles and by using SMART particles. FA nanoparticles enhanced the entry and particle retention to the reticuloendothelial system over nondecorated polymers after systemic administration into mice. These data were seen by MRI testing and validated by comparison with SMART particles and direct evaluation of tissue drug levels after nanoART. The development of alendronate (ALN)-coated magnetite thus serves as a rapid initial screen for the ability of targeting ligands to enhance nanoparticle-antiretroviral drug biodistribution, underscoring the value of decorated magnetite particles as a theranostic tool for improved drug delivery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3779-3790
Number of pages12
JournalInternational journal of nanomedicine
Volume10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 3 2015

Fingerprint

Magnetite Nanoparticles
Ferrosoferric Oxide
Magnetite nanoparticles
Magnetite
Folic Acid
Magnetic resonance imaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Tissue
Pharmacokinetics
Acids
Nanoparticles
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Magnetic resonance
Therapeutics
Pharmacodynamics
Imaging techniques
Alendronate
Mononuclear Phagocyte System
Drug Evaluation
Penetrance

Keywords

  • Decorated nanoparticles
  • Folic acid
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Magnetite
  • Theranostics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Drug Discovery
  • Organic Chemistry

Cite this

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title = "Magnetic resonance imaging of folic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles reflects tissue biodistribution of long-acting antiretroviral therapy",
abstract = "Regimen adherence, systemic toxicities, and limited drug penetrance to viral reservoirs are obstacles limiting the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our laboratory’s development of the monocyte-macrophage-targeted long-acting nanoformulated ART (nanoART) carriage provides a novel opportunity to simplify drug-dosing regimens. Progress has nonetheless been slowed by cumbersome, but required, pharmacokinetic (PK), pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution testing. To this end, we developed a small magnetite ART (SMART) nanoparticle platform to assess antiretroviral drug tissue biodistribution and PK using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Herein, we have taken this technique a signifcant step further by determining nanoART PK with folic acid (FA) decorated magnetite (ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide [USPIO]) particles and by using SMART particles. FA nanoparticles enhanced the entry and particle retention to the reticuloendothelial system over nondecorated polymers after systemic administration into mice. These data were seen by MRI testing and validated by comparison with SMART particles and direct evaluation of tissue drug levels after nanoART. The development of alendronate (ALN)-coated magnetite thus serves as a rapid initial screen for the ability of targeting ligands to enhance nanoparticle-antiretroviral drug biodistribution, underscoring the value of decorated magnetite particles as a theranostic tool for improved drug delivery.",
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author = "Tianyuzi Li and Gendelman, {Howard Eliot} and Gang Zhang and Pavan Puligujja and McMillan, {JoEllyn M} and Bronich, {Tatiana K} and Edagwa, {Benson J} and Liu, {Xin Ming} and Boska, {Michael D.}",
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AU - Li, Tianyuzi

AU - Gendelman, Howard Eliot

AU - Zhang, Gang

AU - Puligujja, Pavan

AU - McMillan, JoEllyn M

AU - Bronich, Tatiana K

AU - Edagwa, Benson J

AU - Liu, Xin Ming

AU - Boska, Michael D.

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