Macrophage-HIV interaction: Viral isolation and target cell tropism

H. E. Gendelman, L. M. Baca, H. Husayni, J. A. Turpin, D. Skillman, D. C. Kalter, J. M. Orenstein, D. L. Hoover, M. S. Meltzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Viral isolates were recovered by cocultivation on macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF)-treated monocyte target cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in 25 out of 27 patients seropositive or at risk of HIV infection. Frequency of virus recovery was independent of the patient's age, sex, number of CD4+ T cells, clinical stage of zidovudine (azidothymidine) therapy. Sixteen out of 19 HIV isolates were serially passaged in MCSF-treated monocytes. Five out of five virus isolates were also passaged in phytohemagglutinin/interleukin-2 (PHA/IL-2)-treated lymphoblasts. In lymphoblasts, no qualitative or quantitative differences were observed between these isolates and human T-cell leukemia viurs IIIB (HTLV-IIIB) for (1) release of p24 antigen reverse transcriptase, and infectious virus, (2) induction of typical cytopathic effects (cell syncytia in 3-10% of cells) and cell lysis, (3) frequency of infected cells (5-20% of PBMC) as detected by in situ hybridization for HIV RNA, (4) down-modualtion of T cell plasma membrane CD4, and (5) site of progeny virion assembly and budding (plasma membrane only with no intracytoplasmic accumulation of virus). Progeny virus recovered from infected lymphoblasts was fully infectious for other lymphoblasts, but failed to infect MCSF-treated monocytes. Detailed analysis of target cell tropism among HIV isolates showed that HIV isolated in monocytes infected both monocytes and lymphoblasts; progeny virus isolated in lymphoblasts infected only T cells. HIV interacts differently with monocytes and T cells. Understanding this interaction may more clearly define both the pathogenesis of HIV disease and strategies for therapeutic intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-228
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

Fingerprint

Tropism
Cell Separation
Monocytes
Macrophages
HIV
Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Viruses
T-Lymphocytes
Zidovudine
Cell Membrane
Blood Cells
T-Cell Leukemia
Virus Activation
RNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
Phytohemagglutinins
Giant Cells
Coculture Techniques
Virion
HIV Infections
Interleukin-2

Keywords

  • Macrophages
  • Viral isolation
  • Viral tropism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Gendelman, H. E., Baca, L. M., Husayni, H., Turpin, J. A., Skillman, D., Kalter, D. C., ... Meltzer, M. S. (1990). Macrophage-HIV interaction: Viral isolation and target cell tropism. AIDS, 4(3), 221-228. https://doi.org/10.1097/00002030-199003000-00007

Macrophage-HIV interaction : Viral isolation and target cell tropism. / Gendelman, H. E.; Baca, L. M.; Husayni, H.; Turpin, J. A.; Skillman, D.; Kalter, D. C.; Orenstein, J. M.; Hoover, D. L.; Meltzer, M. S.

In: AIDS, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.01.1990, p. 221-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gendelman, HE, Baca, LM, Husayni, H, Turpin, JA, Skillman, D, Kalter, DC, Orenstein, JM, Hoover, DL & Meltzer, MS 1990, 'Macrophage-HIV interaction: Viral isolation and target cell tropism', AIDS, vol. 4, no. 3, pp. 221-228. https://doi.org/10.1097/00002030-199003000-00007
Gendelman HE, Baca LM, Husayni H, Turpin JA, Skillman D, Kalter DC et al. Macrophage-HIV interaction: Viral isolation and target cell tropism. AIDS. 1990 Jan 1;4(3):221-228. https://doi.org/10.1097/00002030-199003000-00007
Gendelman, H. E. ; Baca, L. M. ; Husayni, H. ; Turpin, J. A. ; Skillman, D. ; Kalter, D. C. ; Orenstein, J. M. ; Hoover, D. L. ; Meltzer, M. S. / Macrophage-HIV interaction : Viral isolation and target cell tropism. In: AIDS. 1990 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 221-228.
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