Lysophosphatidic acid augments fibroblast-mediated contraction of released collagen gels

Tadashi Mio, Xiang-de Liu, Myron Lee Toews, Stephen I. Rennard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a glycerophospholipid released from platelets that has multiple biologic effects. The present study evaluated the potential of LPA to modulate tissue repair and remodeling by modifying human lung fibroblast-mediated contraction of three-dimensional collagen gels. The contraction of native collagen gels caused by human fetal lung fibroblasts was augmented by LPA in a concentration-dependent manner. The estimated median effective concentration was 3 × 10-7 mol/L, which was well below the concentrations likely released by platelets in tissues. LPA-augmented contraction was not blocked by pertussis toxin or cholera toxin but was inhibited by inhibition of phospholipase C. Neither calcium mobilization nor protein kinase C appeared to play a role. In contrast, the effect of LPA appeared to depend on a kinase inhibited by staurosporine but not by genistein or GF109203X, suggesting a process that depends on phospholipase C and may involve a novel protein kinase. By modulating fibroblast-mediated remodeling, LPA could play a role in the tissue remodeling that characterizes wound repair.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-27
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine
Volume139
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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Fibroblasts
Collagen
Gels
Type C Phospholipases
Tissue
Platelets
Repair
Blood Platelets
Glycerophospholipids
Lung
Staurosporine
Genistein
Cholera Toxin
Pertussis Toxin
Protein Kinases
Protein Kinase C
lysophosphatidic acid
Phosphotransferases
Calcium
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Lysophosphatidic acid augments fibroblast-mediated contraction of released collagen gels. / Mio, Tadashi; Liu, Xiang-de; Toews, Myron Lee; Rennard, Stephen I.

In: Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, Vol. 139, No. 1, 01.01.2002, p. 20-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a glycerophospholipid released from platelets that has multiple biologic effects. The present study evaluated the potential of LPA to modulate tissue repair and remodeling by modifying human lung fibroblast-mediated contraction of three-dimensional collagen gels. The contraction of native collagen gels caused by human fetal lung fibroblasts was augmented by LPA in a concentration-dependent manner. The estimated median effective concentration was 3 × 10-7 mol/L, which was well below the concentrations likely released by platelets in tissues. LPA-augmented contraction was not blocked by pertussis toxin or cholera toxin but was inhibited by inhibition of phospholipase C. Neither calcium mobilization nor protein kinase C appeared to play a role. In contrast, the effect of LPA appeared to depend on a kinase inhibited by staurosporine but not by genistein or GF109203X, suggesting a process that depends on phospholipase C and may involve a novel protein kinase. By modulating fibroblast-mediated remodeling, LPA could play a role in the tissue remodeling that characterizes wound repair.

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