Lung fluid balance, vascular permeability, and gas exchange after acid aspiration in awake goats

R. Winn, Joseph Clarke Stothert Jr, B. Nadir, J. Hildebrandt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Lung injuries were produced by instilling 2.5 ml/kg of 0.1 N Hcl into the trachea of lightly anesthetized goats with previously implanted lung lymph fistulas. Lymph flow (Q(L)), lymph-to-plasma protein concentration ratio (L/P), pulmonary arterial and wedge pressures (Ppa, Pw), percent shunt (Qs/QT), and postmortem extravascular lung water (EVLW) were then measured for up to 48 h. Q(L) began to increase within 15 min of injury from a baseline value of 7.2 ml/h to reach a peak of 231% of base line by 1.5 h, then decreased to 160% at 24 h and returned to base line by 48 h. Average L/P increased from 0.66 to a peak of 0.73 at 2 h. Ppa increased from 17.0 cmH2O to a first peak of 25.3 cmH2O at 15 min, then decreased to base line by 75 min. There was a second rise that peaked at 3 h before returning to base line at 24-48 h; Pw was unchanged throughout. Qs/QT increased from 8.5 to a peak of 34% at 1 h, then decreased to 15% at 4 h, and stabilized at 17-20% at 48 h. EVLW was 237% of base line at 4 h and declined somewhat but remained elevated at 194% of base line at 24 and 48 h. Qs/QT was less than expected based on the reduction in lung volume after aspiration. We conclude that microvascular permeability was increased after acid and that a protective vasoconstriction, probably due to local hypoxia, directed blood away from nonventilated alveoli.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)979-985
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology
Volume56
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

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Water-Electrolyte Balance
Capillary Permeability
Lymph
Goats
Extravascular Lung Water
Gases
Lung
Acids
Pulmonary Wedge Pressure
Pneumonectomy
Lung Injury
Trachea
Vasoconstriction
Fistula
Blood Proteins
Arterial Pressure
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Lung fluid balance, vascular permeability, and gas exchange after acid aspiration in awake goats. / Winn, R.; Stothert Jr, Joseph Clarke; Nadir, B.; Hildebrandt, J.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology, Vol. 56, No. 4, 01.01.1984, p. 979-985.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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