Abstract

Background: The role of oxidative stress remains unclear in the multifactorial pathophysiologic mechanism of lung disease in preterm infants. Aims: The aim of this study was to examine the associations among chronic lung disease (CLD), oxidative stress, and oxygen requirements in preterm infants. Design: Prospective, longitudinal, and correlational design. Subjects: Preterm infants born at <32 weeks’ gestation (N = 31), median gestation of 29.0 weeks (range 24.9–31.7). Measurements: The diagnosis of CLD was obtained from the medical record. Oxidative stress was measured using 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the cord blood at birth and urine on Days 1 and 7. Oxygen requirements were measured using fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) recorded in the first hour after birth/admission and the average FIO2 during the first 12 hr and 7 days after birth. Descriptive statistics are presented. Comparison analyses were performed using Kruskal–Wallis and Fisher’s exact tests. Results: Infants with CLD (n = 12) had lower gestational age (p =.04) and weight (p =.04) at birth, more days on the ventilator (p =.004), and longer neonatal intensive care unit stay (p =.04) compared to infants without CLD (n = 19). CLD was associated with lower oxidative stress levels (p =.03) and higher oxygen requirements during the first 12 hr (p =.025) and on Day 7 (p =.001). Lower oxidative stress levels on Day 7 were associated with higher oxygen requirements in the first 12 hr (p =.01) and on Day 7 (p =.03). Conclusion: Our results linking CLD and higher oxygen requirements with low oxidative stress contradict previous reports. Findings identify a gap in knowledge for postresuscitation oxygen therapy in preterm infants and expose the role of oxidative stress from inflammation and intermittent hypoxia in the etiology of CLD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-330
Number of pages9
JournalBiological Research for Nursing
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Premature Infants
Lung Diseases
Oxidative Stress
Chronic Disease
Oxygen
Parturition
Pregnancy
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Mechanical Ventilators
Fetal Blood
Gestational Age
Medical Records
Urine
Inflammation
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • chronic lung disease
  • oxidative stress
  • preterm infant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Research and Theory

Cite this

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title = "Lung Disease, Oxidative Stress, and Oxygen Requirements in Preterm Infants",
abstract = "Background: The role of oxidative stress remains unclear in the multifactorial pathophysiologic mechanism of lung disease in preterm infants. Aims: The aim of this study was to examine the associations among chronic lung disease (CLD), oxidative stress, and oxygen requirements in preterm infants. Design: Prospective, longitudinal, and correlational design. Subjects: Preterm infants born at <32 weeks’ gestation (N = 31), median gestation of 29.0 weeks (range 24.9–31.7). Measurements: The diagnosis of CLD was obtained from the medical record. Oxidative stress was measured using 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the cord blood at birth and urine on Days 1 and 7. Oxygen requirements were measured using fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) recorded in the first hour after birth/admission and the average FIO2 during the first 12 hr and 7 days after birth. Descriptive statistics are presented. Comparison analyses were performed using Kruskal–Wallis and Fisher’s exact tests. Results: Infants with CLD (n = 12) had lower gestational age (p =.04) and weight (p =.04) at birth, more days on the ventilator (p =.004), and longer neonatal intensive care unit stay (p =.04) compared to infants without CLD (n = 19). CLD was associated with lower oxidative stress levels (p =.03) and higher oxygen requirements during the first 12 hr (p =.025) and on Day 7 (p =.001). Lower oxidative stress levels on Day 7 were associated with higher oxygen requirements in the first 12 hr (p =.01) and on Day 7 (p =.03). Conclusion: Our results linking CLD and higher oxygen requirements with low oxidative stress contradict previous reports. Findings identify a gap in knowledge for postresuscitation oxygen therapy in preterm infants and expose the role of oxidative stress from inflammation and intermittent hypoxia in the etiology of CLD.",
keywords = "chronic lung disease, oxidative stress, preterm infant",
author = "Moore, {Tiffany A} and Schmid, {Kendra K} and {Anderson Berry}, {Ann L} and Berger, {Ann Malone}",
year = "2015",
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doi = "10.1177/1099800415611746",
language = "English (US)",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Lung Disease, Oxidative Stress, and Oxygen Requirements in Preterm Infants

AU - Moore, Tiffany A

AU - Schmid, Kendra K

AU - Anderson Berry, Ann L

AU - Berger, Ann Malone

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background: The role of oxidative stress remains unclear in the multifactorial pathophysiologic mechanism of lung disease in preterm infants. Aims: The aim of this study was to examine the associations among chronic lung disease (CLD), oxidative stress, and oxygen requirements in preterm infants. Design: Prospective, longitudinal, and correlational design. Subjects: Preterm infants born at <32 weeks’ gestation (N = 31), median gestation of 29.0 weeks (range 24.9–31.7). Measurements: The diagnosis of CLD was obtained from the medical record. Oxidative stress was measured using 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the cord blood at birth and urine on Days 1 and 7. Oxygen requirements were measured using fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) recorded in the first hour after birth/admission and the average FIO2 during the first 12 hr and 7 days after birth. Descriptive statistics are presented. Comparison analyses were performed using Kruskal–Wallis and Fisher’s exact tests. Results: Infants with CLD (n = 12) had lower gestational age (p =.04) and weight (p =.04) at birth, more days on the ventilator (p =.004), and longer neonatal intensive care unit stay (p =.04) compared to infants without CLD (n = 19). CLD was associated with lower oxidative stress levels (p =.03) and higher oxygen requirements during the first 12 hr (p =.025) and on Day 7 (p =.001). Lower oxidative stress levels on Day 7 were associated with higher oxygen requirements in the first 12 hr (p =.01) and on Day 7 (p =.03). Conclusion: Our results linking CLD and higher oxygen requirements with low oxidative stress contradict previous reports. Findings identify a gap in knowledge for postresuscitation oxygen therapy in preterm infants and expose the role of oxidative stress from inflammation and intermittent hypoxia in the etiology of CLD.

AB - Background: The role of oxidative stress remains unclear in the multifactorial pathophysiologic mechanism of lung disease in preterm infants. Aims: The aim of this study was to examine the associations among chronic lung disease (CLD), oxidative stress, and oxygen requirements in preterm infants. Design: Prospective, longitudinal, and correlational design. Subjects: Preterm infants born at <32 weeks’ gestation (N = 31), median gestation of 29.0 weeks (range 24.9–31.7). Measurements: The diagnosis of CLD was obtained from the medical record. Oxidative stress was measured using 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the cord blood at birth and urine on Days 1 and 7. Oxygen requirements were measured using fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) recorded in the first hour after birth/admission and the average FIO2 during the first 12 hr and 7 days after birth. Descriptive statistics are presented. Comparison analyses were performed using Kruskal–Wallis and Fisher’s exact tests. Results: Infants with CLD (n = 12) had lower gestational age (p =.04) and weight (p =.04) at birth, more days on the ventilator (p =.004), and longer neonatal intensive care unit stay (p =.04) compared to infants without CLD (n = 19). CLD was associated with lower oxidative stress levels (p =.03) and higher oxygen requirements during the first 12 hr (p =.025) and on Day 7 (p =.001). Lower oxidative stress levels on Day 7 were associated with higher oxygen requirements in the first 12 hr (p =.01) and on Day 7 (p =.03). Conclusion: Our results linking CLD and higher oxygen requirements with low oxidative stress contradict previous reports. Findings identify a gap in knowledge for postresuscitation oxygen therapy in preterm infants and expose the role of oxidative stress from inflammation and intermittent hypoxia in the etiology of CLD.

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KW - oxidative stress

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