Low rate of dermatology outpatient visits in Asian-Americans

An initial survey study for associated patient-related factors

Bharathi Lingala, Shufeng Li, Ashley Wysong, Allison K. Truong, David Kim, Anne Lynn S. Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Asian-Americans represent the fastest growing minority group in the United States, but are under-represented patients in outpatient dermatology clinics. At the same time, skin cancer rates in individuals of Asian descent are increasing, but skin cancer detection appears to be delayed in Asian-Americans compared to white individuals. Some health-care provider related factors for this phenomenon have been reported in the literature, but the patient-related factors are unclear.Methods: This exploratory study to identify patient-related factors associated with dermatology visits in Asian-Americans was performed after Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval. An anonymous, online survey utilizing validated items was conducted on adults who self-identified as Asian-American in Northern California. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression for dermatology visits as indicated by responses to the question of " ever having had skin checked by a dermatologist" were performed on survey responses pertaining to demographic information, socioeconomic factors, acculturation, knowledge of melanoma warning signs and SSE belief and practice.Results: 89.7% of individuals who opened the online survey completed the items, with 469 surveys included in the analysis. Only 60% reported ever performing a SSE, and only 48% reported ever having a skin examination by a dermatologist. Multivariate models showed that " ever performing SSE" (p < 0.0001), marital status (p = 0.02), family history of skin cancer (p = 0.03) and generation in the United States (p = 0.02) were significant predictors of the primary outcome of " ever had skin checked by a dermatologist" .Conclusions: Identification of patient-related factors that associate with dermatology clinic visits in Asian-Americans is important so that this potential gap in dermatologic care can be better addressed through future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number13
JournalBMC Dermatology
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2 2014

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Asian Americans
Dermatology
Outpatients
Skin Neoplasms
Skin
Acculturation
Minority Groups
Research Ethics Committees
Marital Status
Ambulatory Care
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Health Personnel
Melanoma
Logistic Models
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires
Dermatologists

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Asian-Americans
  • Dermatology
  • Dermatology visits
  • Early detection
  • Ethnic skin
  • Prevention
  • Skin cancer
  • Skin self-examination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Low rate of dermatology outpatient visits in Asian-Americans : An initial survey study for associated patient-related factors. / Lingala, Bharathi; Li, Shufeng; Wysong, Ashley; Truong, Allison K.; Kim, David; Chang, Anne Lynn S.

In: BMC Dermatology, Vol. 14, No. 1, 13, 02.08.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lingala, Bharathi ; Li, Shufeng ; Wysong, Ashley ; Truong, Allison K. ; Kim, David ; Chang, Anne Lynn S. / Low rate of dermatology outpatient visits in Asian-Americans : An initial survey study for associated patient-related factors. In: BMC Dermatology. 2014 ; Vol. 14, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: Asian-Americans represent the fastest growing minority group in the United States, but are under-represented patients in outpatient dermatology clinics. At the same time, skin cancer rates in individuals of Asian descent are increasing, but skin cancer detection appears to be delayed in Asian-Americans compared to white individuals. Some health-care provider related factors for this phenomenon have been reported in the literature, but the patient-related factors are unclear.Methods: This exploratory study to identify patient-related factors associated with dermatology visits in Asian-Americans was performed after Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval. An anonymous, online survey utilizing validated items was conducted on adults who self-identified as Asian-American in Northern California. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression for dermatology visits as indicated by responses to the question of {"} ever having had skin checked by a dermatologist{"} were performed on survey responses pertaining to demographic information, socioeconomic factors, acculturation, knowledge of melanoma warning signs and SSE belief and practice.Results: 89.7{\%} of individuals who opened the online survey completed the items, with 469 surveys included in the analysis. Only 60{\%} reported ever performing a SSE, and only 48{\%} reported ever having a skin examination by a dermatologist. Multivariate models showed that {"} ever performing SSE{"} (p < 0.0001), marital status (p = 0.02), family history of skin cancer (p = 0.03) and generation in the United States (p = 0.02) were significant predictors of the primary outcome of {"} ever had skin checked by a dermatologist{"} .Conclusions: Identification of patient-related factors that associate with dermatology clinic visits in Asian-Americans is important so that this potential gap in dermatologic care can be better addressed through future studies.",
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