Low-dislocation-density silicon-on-insulator material produced by sequential oxygen implantation and low-temperature annealing

D. Venables, K. S. Jones, Fereydoon Namavar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lattice strain and defect formation in oxygen-implanted silicon (SIMOX) were investigated by high-resolution x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. At doses of 1×1017 and 3×1017 cm-2 a high density of vacancy-type defects formed in a uniaxially compressed layer at the surface of the as-implanted wafer. Annealing at 900°C for 0.5 h reduced this negative strain as the defects coarsened into observable cavities. The development of cavities upon annealing was used in a sequential-implantation and low-temperature-annealing process to produce low-threading dislocation density SIMOX. This new process offers several advantages over other methods of producing low-dislocation-density material.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3147-3149
Number of pages3
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume60
Issue number25
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1992

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implantation
insulators
annealing
defects
silicon
oxygen
cavities
x ray diffraction
wafers
dosage
transmission electron microscopy
high resolution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Low-dislocation-density silicon-on-insulator material produced by sequential oxygen implantation and low-temperature annealing. / Venables, D.; Jones, K. S.; Namavar, Fereydoon.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 60, No. 25, 01.12.1992, p. 3147-3149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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