Loss of p53 protein in human papillomavirus type 16 E6-immortalized human mammary epithelial cells

Vimla Band, James A. De Caprio, Laurie Delmolino, Victoria Kulesa, Ruth Sager

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

160 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have shown previously that introduction of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) or HPV18 genome into human mammary epithelial cells induces their immortalization. These immortalized cells have reduced growth factor requirements. We report here that transfection with a single HPV16 gene E6 is sufficient to immortalize these cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. The RB protein is normal in these cells, but the p53 protein is sharply reduced, as shown by immunoprecipitation with anti-p53 antibody (pAB 421). We infer that the E6 protein reduces the p53 protein perhaps by signalling its destruction by the ubiquitin system. The HPV-transforming gene E7 was unable to immortalize human mammary epithelial cells. Thus, cell-specific factors may determine which viral oncogene plays a major role in oncogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6671-6676
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of virology
Volume65
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 1991

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Papillomaviridae
breasts
Breast
epithelial cells
Epithelial Cells
Human papillomavirus 16
Oncogenes
growth factors
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Proteins
proteins
cells
oncogenes
Human Genome
transfection
ubiquitin
Ubiquitin
Immunoprecipitation
carcinogenesis
Transfection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Band, V., De Caprio, J. A., Delmolino, L., Kulesa, V., & Sager, R. (1991). Loss of p53 protein in human papillomavirus type 16 E6-immortalized human mammary epithelial cells. Journal of virology, 65(12), 6671-6676.

Loss of p53 protein in human papillomavirus type 16 E6-immortalized human mammary epithelial cells. / Band, Vimla; De Caprio, James A.; Delmolino, Laurie; Kulesa, Victoria; Sager, Ruth.

In: Journal of virology, Vol. 65, No. 12, 01.12.1991, p. 6671-6676.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Band, V, De Caprio, JA, Delmolino, L, Kulesa, V & Sager, R 1991, 'Loss of p53 protein in human papillomavirus type 16 E6-immortalized human mammary epithelial cells', Journal of virology, vol. 65, no. 12, pp. 6671-6676.
Band, Vimla ; De Caprio, James A. ; Delmolino, Laurie ; Kulesa, Victoria ; Sager, Ruth. / Loss of p53 protein in human papillomavirus type 16 E6-immortalized human mammary epithelial cells. In: Journal of virology. 1991 ; Vol. 65, No. 12. pp. 6671-6676.
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