Looming Threats and Animacy

Reduced Responsiveness in Youth with Disrupted Behavior Disorders

Stuart F White, Laura C. Thornton, Joseph Leshin, Roberta Clanton, Stephen Sinclair, Dionne Coker-Appiah, Harma Meffert, Soonjo Hwang, Robert James Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Theoretical models have implicated amygdala dysfunction in the development of Disruptive Behavior Disorders (DBDs; Conduct Disorder/Oppositional Defiant Disorder). Amygdala dysfunction impacts valence evaluation/response selection and emotion attention in youth with DBDs, particularly in those with elevated callous-unemotional (CU) traits. However, amygdala responsiveness during social cognition and the responsiveness of the acute threat circuitry (amygdala/periaqueductal gray) in youth with DBDs have been less well-examined, particularly with reference to CU traits. 31 youth with DBDs and 27 typically developing youth (IQ, age and gender-matched) completed a threat paradigm during fMRI where animate and inanimate, threatening and neutral stimuli appeared to loom towards or recede from participants. Reduced responsiveness to threat variables, including visual threats and encroaching stimuli, was observed within acute threat circuitry and temporal, lateral frontal and parietal cortices in youth with DBDs. This reduced responsiveness, at least with respect to the looming variable, was modulated by CU traits. Reduced responsiveness to animacy information was also observed within temporal, lateral frontal and parietal cortices, but not within amygdala. Reduced responsiveness to animacy information as a function of CU traits was observed in PCC, though not within the amygdala. Reduced threat responsiveness may contribute to risk taking and impulsivity in youth with DBDs, particularly those with high levels of CU traits. Future work will need to examine the degree to which this reduced response to animacy is independent of amygdala dysfunction in youth with DBDs and what role PCC might play in the dysfunctional social cognition observed in youth with high levels of CU traits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)741-754
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Abnormal Child Psychology
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

Fingerprint

Mental Disorders
Amygdala
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Parietal Lobe
Frontal Lobe
Cognition
Conduct Disorder
Periaqueductal Gray
Impulsive Behavior
Risk-Taking
Emotions
Theoretical Models
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Amygdala
  • Animacy
  • Conduct disorder
  • Disruptive behavior disorders
  • Oppositional defiant disorder
  • Threat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Looming Threats and Animacy : Reduced Responsiveness in Youth with Disrupted Behavior Disorders. / White, Stuart F; Thornton, Laura C.; Leshin, Joseph; Clanton, Roberta; Sinclair, Stephen; Coker-Appiah, Dionne; Meffert, Harma; Hwang, Soonjo; Blair, Robert James.

In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, Vol. 46, No. 4, 01.05.2018, p. 741-754.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

White, Stuart F ; Thornton, Laura C. ; Leshin, Joseph ; Clanton, Roberta ; Sinclair, Stephen ; Coker-Appiah, Dionne ; Meffert, Harma ; Hwang, Soonjo ; Blair, Robert James. / Looming Threats and Animacy : Reduced Responsiveness in Youth with Disrupted Behavior Disorders. In: Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. 2018 ; Vol. 46, No. 4. pp. 741-754.
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