Longitudinal relationships between neurocognition, theory of mind, and community functioning in outpatients with serious mental illness

Elizabeth A. Cook, Nancy H. Liu, Melissa Tarasenko, Charlie A. Davidson, William D Spaulding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between neurocognition, theory of mind, and community functioning in a sample of 43 outpatients with serious mental illness (SMI). Relationships between baseline values and changes over time were analyzed using multilevel modeling. The results showed that a) neurocognition and theory of mind were each associated with community functioning at baseline, b) community functioning improved during approximately 12 months of treatment, c) greater improvement in neurocognition over time predicted higher rates of improvement in community functioning, d) theory of mind did not predict change in community functioning after controlling for neurocognition, and e) the effect of change in neurocognition on community functioning did not depend on the effect of baseline neurocognition. This study provides empirical support that individuals with SMI may experience improvement in community functioning, especially when they also experience improvement in neurocognition. Limitations and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)786-794
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nervous and Mental Disease
Volume201
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

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Theory of Mind
Outpatients

Keywords

  • Multilevel modeling
  • cognitive remediation
  • psychiatric rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Longitudinal relationships between neurocognition, theory of mind, and community functioning in outpatients with serious mental illness. / Cook, Elizabeth A.; Liu, Nancy H.; Tarasenko, Melissa; Davidson, Charlie A.; Spaulding, William D.

In: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, Vol. 201, No. 9, 01.09.2013, p. 786-794.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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