Longitudinal quantification of adenovirus neutralizing responses in Zambian mother-infant pairs: Impact of HIV-1 infection and its treatment

Sara R. Privatt, Brianna L. Bullard, Eric A. Weaver, Charles Wood, John T. West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Vaccination offers the most cost-effective approach to limiting the adverse impact of infectious and neoplastic diseases that reduce the quality of life in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). However, it is unclear what vaccine vectors would be most readily implementable in the setting and at what age they should be applied for maximal efficacy. Adenoviruses (Ad) and Ad-based vectors have been demonstrated to induce effective humoral and cellular immune responses in animal models and in humans. However, because immunity associated with Ad infection is lifelong, there exists a debate as to whether pre-existing immunity might decrease the efficacy of Ad vectored vaccines. In order to begin to rationally develop vaccination strategies for SSA, we have quantified neutralizing antibodies (nAb) against Ad4, Ad5, Ad7, Ad26, Ad28, Ad45 and Ad48 in 67 adult women and their infants. We are the first to define the decay kinetics of transferred maternal nAb in infants as well as the apparent initiation of de novo Ad responses. Our findings demonstrate that in Zambian adults, robust nAb responses exist against each of the Ads tested and are efficiently transferred to newborns. With few exceptions, neither the HIV-1 infection status of the mothers or the antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment of HIV-1 disease had significant impact on maternal Ad nAb responses or their transfer to infants. However, maternal Ad nAb decays in infants to a nadir at 12 months of age such that any of the seven Ad types could function as vaccine vectors. The definition of this ‘window of opportunity’ provides important foundational data for rational design and implementation of Ad vectors in this setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5177-5184
Number of pages8
JournalVaccine
Volume37
Issue number36
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 23 2019

Fingerprint

Adenoviridae
Human immunodeficiency virus 1
neutralization
HIV Infections
HIV-1
Mothers
Neutralizing Antibodies
neutralizing antibodies
infection
vector vaccines
Africa South of the Sahara
Therapeutics
Sub-Saharan Africa
Antibody Formation
Immunity
Vaccination
Adenovirus Vaccines
Vaccines
immunity
Adenoviridae Infections

Keywords

  • Adenovirus
  • HIV
  • Seroprevalence
  • Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Vector

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • veterinary(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Longitudinal quantification of adenovirus neutralizing responses in Zambian mother-infant pairs : Impact of HIV-1 infection and its treatment. / Privatt, Sara R.; Bullard, Brianna L.; Weaver, Eric A.; Wood, Charles; West, John T.

In: Vaccine, Vol. 37, No. 36, 23.08.2019, p. 5177-5184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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