Lipid-polymer hybrid nanocarriers for delivering cancer therapeutics

Tushar Date, Vaishnavi Nimbalkar, Jyostna Kamat, Anupama Mittal, Ram I Mahato, Deepak Chitkara

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cancer remained a major cause of death providing diversified challenges in terms of treatment including non-specific toxicity, chemoresistance and relapse. Nanotechnology- based delivery systems grabbed tremendous attention for delivering cancer therapeutics as they provide benefits including controlled drug release, improved biological half-life, reduced toxicity and targeted delivery. Majority of the nanocarriers consists of either a polymer or a lipid component along with other excipients to stabilize the colloidal system. Lipid-based systems provide advantages like better entrapment efficiency, scalability and low- cost raw materials, however, suffer from limitations including instability, a burst release of the drug, and limited surface functionalization. On the other hand, polymeric systems provide an excellent diversity of chemical modifications, stability, controlled release, however limited drug loading capacities and scale up limit their use. Hybrid nanocarriers consisting of lipid and polymer were able to overcome some of these disadvantages while retaining the advantages of both the systems. Designing a stable lipid-polymer hybrid system requires a thorough understanding of the material properties and their behavior in in vitro and in vivo environments. This review highlights the current status and future prospects of lipid-polymer hybrid systems with a particular focus on cancer nanotherapeutics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-73
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Controlled Release
Volume271
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 10 2018

Fingerprint

Polymers
Lipids
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Nanotechnology
Excipients
Half-Life
Cause of Death
Costs and Cost Analysis
Recurrence
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Drug Liberation

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Hybrid
  • Lipids
  • Nanoparticles
  • Nanotherapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmaceutical Science

Cite this

Lipid-polymer hybrid nanocarriers for delivering cancer therapeutics. / Date, Tushar; Nimbalkar, Vaishnavi; Kamat, Jyostna; Mittal, Anupama; Mahato, Ram I; Chitkara, Deepak.

In: Journal of Controlled Release, Vol. 271, 10.02.2018, p. 60-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Date, Tushar ; Nimbalkar, Vaishnavi ; Kamat, Jyostna ; Mittal, Anupama ; Mahato, Ram I ; Chitkara, Deepak. / Lipid-polymer hybrid nanocarriers for delivering cancer therapeutics. In: Journal of Controlled Release. 2018 ; Vol. 271. pp. 60-73.
@article{1e051a902413452399bd26b26696a0d6,
title = "Lipid-polymer hybrid nanocarriers for delivering cancer therapeutics",
abstract = "Cancer remained a major cause of death providing diversified challenges in terms of treatment including non-specific toxicity, chemoresistance and relapse. Nanotechnology- based delivery systems grabbed tremendous attention for delivering cancer therapeutics as they provide benefits including controlled drug release, improved biological half-life, reduced toxicity and targeted delivery. Majority of the nanocarriers consists of either a polymer or a lipid component along with other excipients to stabilize the colloidal system. Lipid-based systems provide advantages like better entrapment efficiency, scalability and low- cost raw materials, however, suffer from limitations including instability, a burst release of the drug, and limited surface functionalization. On the other hand, polymeric systems provide an excellent diversity of chemical modifications, stability, controlled release, however limited drug loading capacities and scale up limit their use. Hybrid nanocarriers consisting of lipid and polymer were able to overcome some of these disadvantages while retaining the advantages of both the systems. Designing a stable lipid-polymer hybrid system requires a thorough understanding of the material properties and their behavior in in vitro and in vivo environments. This review highlights the current status and future prospects of lipid-polymer hybrid systems with a particular focus on cancer nanotherapeutics.",
keywords = "Cancer, Hybrid, Lipids, Nanoparticles, Nanotherapeutics",
author = "Tushar Date and Vaishnavi Nimbalkar and Jyostna Kamat and Anupama Mittal and Mahato, {Ram I} and Deepak Chitkara",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.jconrel.2017.12.016",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "271",
pages = "60--73",
journal = "Journal of Controlled Release",
issn = "0168-3659",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Lipid-polymer hybrid nanocarriers for delivering cancer therapeutics

AU - Date, Tushar

AU - Nimbalkar, Vaishnavi

AU - Kamat, Jyostna

AU - Mittal, Anupama

AU - Mahato, Ram I

AU - Chitkara, Deepak

PY - 2018/2/10

Y1 - 2018/2/10

N2 - Cancer remained a major cause of death providing diversified challenges in terms of treatment including non-specific toxicity, chemoresistance and relapse. Nanotechnology- based delivery systems grabbed tremendous attention for delivering cancer therapeutics as they provide benefits including controlled drug release, improved biological half-life, reduced toxicity and targeted delivery. Majority of the nanocarriers consists of either a polymer or a lipid component along with other excipients to stabilize the colloidal system. Lipid-based systems provide advantages like better entrapment efficiency, scalability and low- cost raw materials, however, suffer from limitations including instability, a burst release of the drug, and limited surface functionalization. On the other hand, polymeric systems provide an excellent diversity of chemical modifications, stability, controlled release, however limited drug loading capacities and scale up limit their use. Hybrid nanocarriers consisting of lipid and polymer were able to overcome some of these disadvantages while retaining the advantages of both the systems. Designing a stable lipid-polymer hybrid system requires a thorough understanding of the material properties and their behavior in in vitro and in vivo environments. This review highlights the current status and future prospects of lipid-polymer hybrid systems with a particular focus on cancer nanotherapeutics.

AB - Cancer remained a major cause of death providing diversified challenges in terms of treatment including non-specific toxicity, chemoresistance and relapse. Nanotechnology- based delivery systems grabbed tremendous attention for delivering cancer therapeutics as they provide benefits including controlled drug release, improved biological half-life, reduced toxicity and targeted delivery. Majority of the nanocarriers consists of either a polymer or a lipid component along with other excipients to stabilize the colloidal system. Lipid-based systems provide advantages like better entrapment efficiency, scalability and low- cost raw materials, however, suffer from limitations including instability, a burst release of the drug, and limited surface functionalization. On the other hand, polymeric systems provide an excellent diversity of chemical modifications, stability, controlled release, however limited drug loading capacities and scale up limit their use. Hybrid nanocarriers consisting of lipid and polymer were able to overcome some of these disadvantages while retaining the advantages of both the systems. Designing a stable lipid-polymer hybrid system requires a thorough understanding of the material properties and their behavior in in vitro and in vivo environments. This review highlights the current status and future prospects of lipid-polymer hybrid systems with a particular focus on cancer nanotherapeutics.

KW - Cancer

KW - Hybrid

KW - Lipids

KW - Nanoparticles

KW - Nanotherapeutics

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85039799515&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85039799515&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jconrel.2017.12.016

DO - 10.1016/j.jconrel.2017.12.016

M3 - Review article

C2 - 29273320

AN - SCOPUS:85039799515

VL - 271

SP - 60

EP - 73

JO - Journal of Controlled Release

JF - Journal of Controlled Release

SN - 0168-3659

ER -