Likelihood of using drug courts

Predictions using procedural justice and the theory of planned behavior

Evelyn M. Maeder, Richard L Wiener

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current research compares two theoretical models borrowed from social psychology (theory of planned behavior and procedural justice) to predict intentions to make use of a drug court. Medicaid-eligible substance users answered a number of questions regarding their intentions to use a drug court in the future, including items from planned behavior and procedural justice scales. When procedural justice was considered alone, only trustworthiness predicted intention to use drug courts. When planned behavior was considered alone, only deliberative attitudes predicted the intention. After combining the two models, deliberative attitudes from the theory of planned behavior were the only significant predictor of likelihood to make use of a drug court. Recommendations for future study of this area center on conceptualization of procedural justice and the use of alternative samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)543-553
Number of pages11
JournalBehavioral Sciences and the Law
Volume26
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

Fingerprint

Social Justice
justice
drug
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Social Psychology
trustworthiness
Medicaid
social psychology
drug use
Theoretical Models
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Law

Cite this

Likelihood of using drug courts : Predictions using procedural justice and the theory of planned behavior. / Maeder, Evelyn M.; Wiener, Richard L.

In: Behavioral Sciences and the Law, Vol. 26, No. 5, 01.12.2008, p. 543-553.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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