Life-cycle, total-industry genetic improvement of feed efficiency in beef cattle: Blueprint for the Beef Improvement Federation11The development of this commentary was supported by the Beef Improvement Federation

M. K. Nielsen, M. D. MacNeil, J. C.M. Dekkers, D. H. Crews, T. A. Rathje, R. M. Enns, R. L. Weaber

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

On a life-cycle basis, beef animals are able to consume large amounts of low-cost, low-quality forages relative to higher-cost concentrates compared with pigs and chickens. However, of the 3, beef is still more expensive to produce on a cost-per-edible pound basis. Accordingly, there is need for genetic programs and management changes that will improve efficiency, sustainability, and profitability of beef production. Options include improving reproductive rate, reducing feed used for maintenance, or both, while not reducing output. A goal for improving efficiency of feed utilization is to reduce the amount or proportion of feed used for maintenance. Such reduction is a target for genetic improvement, but such a goal does not include defining a single measure of efficiency. A single efficiency measure would likely lead to single-trait selection and not account for any potentially antagonistic effects on other production characteristics. Because we are not able to explain all variation in individual-animal intake from only knowledge of BW maintained and level of production, measuring feed intake is necessary. Therefore, our recommendation is that national cattle evaluation systems analyze feed intake as an economically relevant trait with incorporation of appropriate indicator traits for an EPD for feed intake requirements that could then be used in a multiple-trait setting such as in a selection index. With improvements in technology for measurement of feed intake, individual measures of feed intake should continually be collected to facilitate development of genetic predictors that enhance accuracy of prediction of progeny differences in national cattle evaluations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-565
Number of pages7
JournalProfessional Animal Scientist
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

Fingerprint

Life Cycle Stages
beef cattle
genetic improvement
life cycle (organisms)
Industry
beef
feed conversion
feed intake
industry
Costs and Cost Analysis
Maintenance
Systems Analysis
Chickens
Swine
selection index
cattle
Technology
forage quality
profitability
animals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Life-cycle, total-industry genetic improvement of feed efficiency in beef cattle : Blueprint for the Beef Improvement Federation11The development of this commentary was supported by the Beef Improvement Federation. / Nielsen, M. K.; MacNeil, M. D.; Dekkers, J. C.M.; Crews, D. H.; Rathje, T. A.; Enns, R. M.; Weaber, R. L.

In: Professional Animal Scientist, Vol. 29, No. 6, 01.12.2013, p. 559-565.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{e759f144ea3d4b84845f8c900c7b0a1f,
title = "Life-cycle, total-industry genetic improvement of feed efficiency in beef cattle: Blueprint for the Beef Improvement Federation11The development of this commentary was supported by the Beef Improvement Federation",
abstract = "On a life-cycle basis, beef animals are able to consume large amounts of low-cost, low-quality forages relative to higher-cost concentrates compared with pigs and chickens. However, of the 3, beef is still more expensive to produce on a cost-per-edible pound basis. Accordingly, there is need for genetic programs and management changes that will improve efficiency, sustainability, and profitability of beef production. Options include improving reproductive rate, reducing feed used for maintenance, or both, while not reducing output. A goal for improving efficiency of feed utilization is to reduce the amount or proportion of feed used for maintenance. Such reduction is a target for genetic improvement, but such a goal does not include defining a single measure of efficiency. A single efficiency measure would likely lead to single-trait selection and not account for any potentially antagonistic effects on other production characteristics. Because we are not able to explain all variation in individual-animal intake from only knowledge of BW maintained and level of production, measuring feed intake is necessary. Therefore, our recommendation is that national cattle evaluation systems analyze feed intake as an economically relevant trait with incorporation of appropriate indicator traits for an EPD for feed intake requirements that could then be used in a multiple-trait setting such as in a selection index. With improvements in technology for measurement of feed intake, individual measures of feed intake should continually be collected to facilitate development of genetic predictors that enhance accuracy of prediction of progeny differences in national cattle evaluations.",
author = "Nielsen, {M. K.} and MacNeil, {M. D.} and Dekkers, {J. C.M.} and Crews, {D. H.} and Rathje, {T. A.} and Enns, {R. M.} and Weaber, {R. L.}",
year = "2013",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.15232/S1080-7446(15)30285-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "29",
pages = "559--565",
journal = "Applied Animal Science",
issn = "2590-2873",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Life-cycle, total-industry genetic improvement of feed efficiency in beef cattle

T2 - Blueprint for the Beef Improvement Federation11The development of this commentary was supported by the Beef Improvement Federation

AU - Nielsen, M. K.

AU - MacNeil, M. D.

AU - Dekkers, J. C.M.

AU - Crews, D. H.

AU - Rathje, T. A.

AU - Enns, R. M.

AU - Weaber, R. L.

PY - 2013/12/1

Y1 - 2013/12/1

N2 - On a life-cycle basis, beef animals are able to consume large amounts of low-cost, low-quality forages relative to higher-cost concentrates compared with pigs and chickens. However, of the 3, beef is still more expensive to produce on a cost-per-edible pound basis. Accordingly, there is need for genetic programs and management changes that will improve efficiency, sustainability, and profitability of beef production. Options include improving reproductive rate, reducing feed used for maintenance, or both, while not reducing output. A goal for improving efficiency of feed utilization is to reduce the amount or proportion of feed used for maintenance. Such reduction is a target for genetic improvement, but such a goal does not include defining a single measure of efficiency. A single efficiency measure would likely lead to single-trait selection and not account for any potentially antagonistic effects on other production characteristics. Because we are not able to explain all variation in individual-animal intake from only knowledge of BW maintained and level of production, measuring feed intake is necessary. Therefore, our recommendation is that national cattle evaluation systems analyze feed intake as an economically relevant trait with incorporation of appropriate indicator traits for an EPD for feed intake requirements that could then be used in a multiple-trait setting such as in a selection index. With improvements in technology for measurement of feed intake, individual measures of feed intake should continually be collected to facilitate development of genetic predictors that enhance accuracy of prediction of progeny differences in national cattle evaluations.

AB - On a life-cycle basis, beef animals are able to consume large amounts of low-cost, low-quality forages relative to higher-cost concentrates compared with pigs and chickens. However, of the 3, beef is still more expensive to produce on a cost-per-edible pound basis. Accordingly, there is need for genetic programs and management changes that will improve efficiency, sustainability, and profitability of beef production. Options include improving reproductive rate, reducing feed used for maintenance, or both, while not reducing output. A goal for improving efficiency of feed utilization is to reduce the amount or proportion of feed used for maintenance. Such reduction is a target for genetic improvement, but such a goal does not include defining a single measure of efficiency. A single efficiency measure would likely lead to single-trait selection and not account for any potentially antagonistic effects on other production characteristics. Because we are not able to explain all variation in individual-animal intake from only knowledge of BW maintained and level of production, measuring feed intake is necessary. Therefore, our recommendation is that national cattle evaluation systems analyze feed intake as an economically relevant trait with incorporation of appropriate indicator traits for an EPD for feed intake requirements that could then be used in a multiple-trait setting such as in a selection index. With improvements in technology for measurement of feed intake, individual measures of feed intake should continually be collected to facilitate development of genetic predictors that enhance accuracy of prediction of progeny differences in national cattle evaluations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84957687398&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84957687398&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.15232/S1080-7446(15)30285-0

DO - 10.15232/S1080-7446(15)30285-0

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:84957687398

VL - 29

SP - 559

EP - 565

JO - Applied Animal Science

JF - Applied Animal Science

SN - 2590-2873

IS - 6

ER -