Level of Cigarette Consumption and Duration of Smoking Abstinence During Failed Quit Attempts Among Long-Term Daily Smokers: the Role of Race/Ethnicity and Cessation Aids

Julia N. Soulakova, Lisa J. Crockett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The goal of this study was to determine whether race/ethnicity and use of smoking cessation aids are associated with the duration of the last serious quit attempt and reductions in cigarette consumption among long-term daily smokers who tried, and failed, to quit smoking during the preceding year. Data came from the 2010–2011 Tobacco Use Supplement survey conducted in the USA, and analyses included 6672 reports of long-term daily smokers (i.e., smokers who smoked daily for 1 year or longer) who made at least one serious quit attempt in the past 12 months. About 39% of these smokers used at least one smoking cessation aid during their last quit attempt. Use of aids was significantly lower for non-Hispanic Black (NHB, 29%) and Hispanic (HISP, 29%) smokers than for non-Hispanic White (NHW, 42%) smokers, possibly due to differences in socioeconomic status and access to healthcare for smoking cessation. The effect of using any aids on mean cigarette reduction and duration of the last long quit attempt (i.e., one that lasted a day or more) was similar across race/ethnicity. Using any aids did not substantially influence mean cigarette reduction but was positively associated with duration of the quit attempt: the duration was 6 days longer (CI = 3:10), on average, when aids were used than when smokers attempted to quit unassisted. Race/ethnicity was significantly associated with mean cigarette reduction (p = 0.023); non-Hispanic American Indian and Alaska Native smokers had the highest mean reduction (of 3 cigarettes, CI = 1:5) among the racial/ethnic groups considered. Use of aids may help increase duration of quit attempts and thus, may increase likelihood of quitting successfully in the near future.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-303
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

Fingerprint

tobacco consumption
Tobacco Products
smoking
ethnicity
Smoking
Smoking Cessation
North American Indians
Tobacco Use
American Indian
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
Social Class
nicotine
supplement
social status
ethnic group
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Health-risk behavior
  • National survey
  • Replicate weights
  • Self-report
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Level of Cigarette Consumption and Duration of Smoking Abstinence During Failed Quit Attempts Among Long-Term Daily Smokers: the Role of Race/Ethnicity and Cessation Aids",
abstract = "The goal of this study was to determine whether race/ethnicity and use of smoking cessation aids are associated with the duration of the last serious quit attempt and reductions in cigarette consumption among long-term daily smokers who tried, and failed, to quit smoking during the preceding year. Data came from the 2010–2011 Tobacco Use Supplement survey conducted in the USA, and analyses included 6672 reports of long-term daily smokers (i.e., smokers who smoked daily for 1 year or longer) who made at least one serious quit attempt in the past 12 months. About 39{\%} of these smokers used at least one smoking cessation aid during their last quit attempt. Use of aids was significantly lower for non-Hispanic Black (NHB, 29{\%}) and Hispanic (HISP, 29{\%}) smokers than for non-Hispanic White (NHW, 42{\%}) smokers, possibly due to differences in socioeconomic status and access to healthcare for smoking cessation. The effect of using any aids on mean cigarette reduction and duration of the last long quit attempt (i.e., one that lasted a day or more) was similar across race/ethnicity. Using any aids did not substantially influence mean cigarette reduction but was positively associated with duration of the quit attempt: the duration was 6 days longer (CI = 3:10), on average, when aids were used than when smokers attempted to quit unassisted. Race/ethnicity was significantly associated with mean cigarette reduction (p = 0.023); non-Hispanic American Indian and Alaska Native smokers had the highest mean reduction (of 3 cigarettes, CI = 1:5) among the racial/ethnic groups considered. Use of aids may help increase duration of quit attempts and thus, may increase likelihood of quitting successfully in the near future.",
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