Let the games begin: A preliminary study using Attention Process Training-3 and Lumosity™ brain games to remediate attention deficits following traumatic brain injury

Samantha Zickefoose, Karen Hux, Jessica Brown, Katrina Wulf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primary objective: Computer-based treatments for attention problems have become increasingly popular and available. The researchers sought to determine whether improved performance by survivors of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) on two computer-based treatments generalized to improvements on comparable, untrained tasks and ecologically-plausible attention tasks comprising a standardized assessment. Research design: The researchers used an -A-B-A-C-A treatment design repeated across four adult survivors of severe TBI. Methods and procedures: Participants engaged in 8 weeks of intervention using both Attention Process Training-3 (APT-3) and Lumosity™ (2010) Brain Games. Two participants received APT-3 treatment first, while the other two received Lumosity™ treatment first. All participants received both treatments throughout the course of two, 1-month intervention phases. Main outcomes and results: Individual growth curve analyses showed participants made significant improvements in progressing through both interventions. However, limited generalization occurred: one participant demonstrated significantly improved performance on one of five probe measures and one other participant showed improved performance on some sub-tests of the Test of Everyday Attention; no other significant generalization results emerged. These findings call into question the assumption that intervention using either APT-3 or Lumosity™ will prompt generalization beyond the actual tasks performed during treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)707-716
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Injury
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013

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Brain
Therapeutics
Research Personnel
Traumatic Brain Injury
Research Design
Growth
Survivors

Keywords

  • APT
  • APT-3
  • Acquired brain injury remediation
  • Attention Process Training
  • Attention deficits
  • Attention deficits following traumatic brain injury
  • Attention treatment
  • Brain games
  • Computer-based brain injury treatment
  • Lumosity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Let the games begin : A preliminary study using Attention Process Training-3 and Lumosity™ brain games to remediate attention deficits following traumatic brain injury. / Zickefoose, Samantha; Hux, Karen; Brown, Jessica; Wulf, Katrina.

In: Brain Injury, Vol. 27, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 707-716.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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