Less acting, more doing

How surface acting relates to perceived meeting effectiveness and other employee outcomes

Linda R. Shanock, Joseph A Allen, Alexandra M. Dunn, Benjamin E. Baran, Cliff W. Scott, Steven G. Rogelberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study adds to the growing body of research on work meetings and extends the emotional labour literature beyond a service context by examining the relationship between surface acting during meetings and perceived meeting effectiveness. Additionally, the relationships of surface acting during meetings and perceived meeting effectiveness with time-lagged reports of intention to quit and emotional exhaustion 3 months later were investigated. Structural equation modelling of data from 178 working adults revealed negative relationships between surface acting and perceptions of meeting effectiveness. Perceived meeting effectiveness partially mediated the relationship between surface acting and both intention to quit and emotional exhaustion 3 months later. These findings expand both the limited research on perceived meeting effectiveness and the surface acting nomological network to include a consideration that expressing inauthentic emotions in meetings (surface acting) may relate to the perceived effectiveness of the meeting. As well, both surface acting during meetings and perceived meeting effectiveness may relate to how emotionally exhausted employees feel and their intentions to seek other employment. Given the cost and pervasiveness of meetings in daily organizational life and their potential effects on the well-being of employees, understanding how to make meetings effective is paramount - particularly if researchers and practitioners want to better understand how perceived meeting effectiveness may be related to various employee outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-476
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology
Volume86
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

Fingerprint

Research
Emotions
Research Personnel
Costs and Cost Analysis
Employees
Surface acting
Emotional exhaustion
Intention to quit
Structural equation modeling
Well-being
Emotion
Costs
Emotional labour

Keywords

  • Emotional exhaustion
  • Emotional labour
  • Intentions to quit
  • Meetings
  • Surface acting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

Less acting, more doing : How surface acting relates to perceived meeting effectiveness and other employee outcomes. / Shanock, Linda R.; Allen, Joseph A; Dunn, Alexandra M.; Baran, Benjamin E.; Scott, Cliff W.; Rogelberg, Steven G.

In: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Vol. 86, No. 4, 01.12.2013, p. 457-476.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shanock, Linda R. ; Allen, Joseph A ; Dunn, Alexandra M. ; Baran, Benjamin E. ; Scott, Cliff W. ; Rogelberg, Steven G. / Less acting, more doing : How surface acting relates to perceived meeting effectiveness and other employee outcomes. In: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 86, No. 4. pp. 457-476.
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