Laser-induced-plasma assisted ablation and its applications

M. H. Hong, K. Sugioka, D. J. Wu, K. J. Chew, Y. F. Lu, K. Midorikawa, T. C. Chong

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

It is a high challenge to fabricate glass microstructures in Photonics and LCD industries. Different from direct ablation with ultrafast or short wavelength lasers, laser-induced-plasma-assisted ablation (LIPAA) is one of the potential candidates for transparent substrate microfabrication with conventional visible laser sources. In the processing, laser beam goes through glass substrate first and then irradiates on a solid target behind. For laser fluence above target ablation threshold, plasma generated from target ablation flies forward at a high speed. At a small target-to-substrate distance, there are strong interactions among laser light, target plasma and glass substrate at its rear side surface. With target materials deposition on glass surface or even doping into the substrate, light absorption characteristic at the interaction zone is modified, which causes the glass ablation. LIPAA is used to get color printing of characters, structures and even images on the glass substrate. It is also used to obtain the glass surface metallization for electrodes and circuits fabrication. Potential application of this technique to fabricate functional microstructures, such as micro-Total-Analysis-System (TAS) for DNA analysis and holographic diffuser for IR wireless home networking, is also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)408-413
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume4830
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2002
EventThird International Symposium on Laser Precision Microfabrication - Osaka, Japan
Duration: May 27 2002May 31 2002

Fingerprint

Ablation
ablation
Plasma
Laser
Plasmas
Glass
Substrate
Lasers
glass
Target
Substrates
lasers
Microstructure
Color printing
Microfabrication
microstructure
Diffuser
diffusers
systems analysis
Beam plasma interactions

Keywords

  • Applications
  • Glass microfabrication
  • LIPAA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Laser-induced-plasma assisted ablation and its applications. / Hong, M. H.; Sugioka, K.; Wu, D. J.; Chew, K. J.; Lu, Y. F.; Midorikawa, K.; Chong, T. C.

In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, Vol. 4830, 01.12.2002, p. 408-413.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Hong, M. H. ; Sugioka, K. ; Wu, D. J. ; Chew, K. J. ; Lu, Y. F. ; Midorikawa, K. ; Chong, T. C. / Laser-induced-plasma assisted ablation and its applications. In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. 2002 ; Vol. 4830. pp. 408-413.
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