Language and Motor Development in Infancy

Three Views With Neuropsychological Implications

Victoria J Molfese, Jacqueline C. Betz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study reviews three views of language and motor development in infancy and considers the neuropsychological implications of each. One view ascribes language development to maturation and cerebral lateralization, but as a unique process separate from other developmental (motor) skills. A second view supports the idea that language development and motor development are processes sharing overlapping hemisphere sites; consequently, both forms of development provide an index of hemisphere functioning or lateralization. The third view sees language development and motor development as processes evolving synchronically as the result of central nervous system maturation rather than as a result of hemisphere functioning. These views are considered along with respective supporting empirical research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)255-274
Number of pages20
JournalDevelopmental Neuropsychology
Volume3
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1987

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Language Development
Empirical Research
Motor Skills
Central Nervous System

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Language and Motor Development in Infancy : Three Views With Neuropsychological Implications. / Molfese, Victoria J; Betz, Jacqueline C.

In: Developmental Neuropsychology, Vol. 3, No. 3-4, 01.01.1987, p. 255-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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