Lactobacillus GG in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children

J. A. Vanderhoof, D. B. Whitney, D. L. Antonson, T. L. Hanner, J. V. Lupo, R. J. Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of Lactobacillus casei sps. rhamnosus (Lactobacillus GG) (LGG) in reducing the incidence of antibiotic-associated diarrhea when coadministered with an oral antibiotic in children with acute infectious disorders. Study design: Two hundred two children between 6 months and 10 years of age were enrolled; 188 completed all phases of the protocol. LGG, 1 x 1010 - 2 x 1010 colony forming units per day, or comparable placebo was administered in a double- blind randomized trial to children receiving oral antibiotic therapy in an outpatient setting. The primary caregiver was questioned every 3 days regarding the incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms, predominantly stool frequency and consistency, through telephone contact by blinded investigators. Results: Twenty-five placebo-treated but only 7 LGG-treated patients had diarrhea as defined by liquid stools numbering 2 or greater per day. Lactobacillus GG overall significantly reduced stool frequency and increased stool consistency during antibiotic therapy by the tenth day compared with the placebo group. Conclusion: Lactobacillus GG reduces the incidence of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children treated with oral antibiotics for common childhood infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)564-568
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume135
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Lactobacillus rhamnosus
Diarrhea
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Placebos
Incidence
Lactobacillus casei
Telephone
Caregivers
Outpatients
Stem Cells
Research Personnel
Therapeutics
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Vanderhoof, J. A., Whitney, D. B., Antonson, D. L., Hanner, T. L., Lupo, J. V., & Young, R. J. (1999). Lactobacillus GG in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children. Journal of Pediatrics, 135(5), 564-568. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-3476(99)70053-3

Lactobacillus GG in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children. / Vanderhoof, J. A.; Whitney, D. B.; Antonson, D. L.; Hanner, T. L.; Lupo, J. V.; Young, R. J.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 135, No. 5, 01.01.1999, p. 564-568.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vanderhoof, JA, Whitney, DB, Antonson, DL, Hanner, TL, Lupo, JV & Young, RJ 1999, 'Lactobacillus GG in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 135, no. 5, pp. 564-568. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-3476(99)70053-3
Vanderhoof JA, Whitney DB, Antonson DL, Hanner TL, Lupo JV, Young RJ. Lactobacillus GG in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children. Journal of Pediatrics. 1999 Jan 1;135(5):564-568. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-3476(99)70053-3
Vanderhoof, J. A. ; Whitney, D. B. ; Antonson, D. L. ; Hanner, T. L. ; Lupo, J. V. ; Young, R. J. / Lactobacillus GG in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 1999 ; Vol. 135, No. 5. pp. 564-568.
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