Knowledge of, attitudes toward, and barriers to cancer control and screening among primary care physicians in Egypt

The need for postgraduate medical education

Amr S Soliman, Ahmed A. Raouf, Robert M. Chamberlain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methods. The authors surveyed 177 primary care physicians in Menofeia, in the Nile Delta area of Egypt, to test their knowledge of, attitudes toward, and perceived barriers to cancer control and screening. Results. The physicians viewed cigarette smoking and radiation exposure as the most important cancer risk factors, followed by occupation, family history, and sun exposure. The majority of the physicians saw diet as contributing little or nothing to cancer risk. Most of the physicians lacked knowledge about early cancer detection and screening. Junior practitioners, in particular, reported a lack of information about liver cancer and hepatitis viruses despite the prevalence of these viruses in the country. Large proportions of mid-career and senior primary care physicians who had no postgraduate education cited lack of knowledge and not being familiar with an approach to cancer prevention as reasons for not performing screening activities. Conclusion. The importance of smoking, diet, and early detection of common cancer types should receive more attention in the undergraduate medical curriculum of Egypt. Health and medical education authorities in Egypt should authorize more postgraduate education opportunities for senior primary care physicians, aimed at increasing their knowledge of prevention and improving their attitudes toward primary cancer prevention and screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-107
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume12
Issue number2
StatePublished - Aug 25 1997

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Egypt
Primary Care Physicians
Medical Education
Early Detection of Cancer
Physicians
Smoking
Diet
Education
Neoplasms
Hepatitis Viruses
Solar System
Primary Prevention
Liver Neoplasms
Health Education
Occupations
Curriculum
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Knowledge of, attitudes toward, and barriers to cancer control and screening among primary care physicians in Egypt : The need for postgraduate medical education. / Soliman, Amr S; Raouf, Ahmed A.; Chamberlain, Robert M.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 12, No. 2, 25.08.1997, p. 100-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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