Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices for Cervical Cancer Screening Among the Bhutanese Refugee Community in Omaha, Nebraska

Rebecca J. Haworth, Ruth Margalit, Christine Ross, Tikka Nepal, Amr S. Soliman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among women with the vast majority of patients in developing countries. Bhutanese refugees in the United States are from South Central Asia, the 4th leading region of the world for cervical cancer incidence. Over the past few years, Bhutanese refugees have increased significantly in Nebraska. This study evaluates current knowledge of cervical cancer and screening practices among the Bhutanese refugee women in Omaha, Nebraska. The study aimed to investigate cervical cancer and screening knowledge and perceptions about the susceptibility and severity of cervical cancer and perceived benefits and barriers to screening. Self-administered questionnaires and focus groups based on the Health Belief Model were conducted among 42 healthy women from the Bhutanese refugee community in Omaha. The study revealed a significant lack of knowledge in this community regarding cervical cancer and screening practices, with only 22.2 % reporting ever hearing of a Pap test and 13.9 % reporting ever having one. Only 33.3 % of women were in agreement with their own perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer. Women who reported ever hearing about the Pap test tended to believe more strongly about curability of the disease if discovered early than women who never heard about the test (71.4 vs. 45.0 %, for the two groups. respectively). Refugee populations in the United States are in need for tailored cancer education programs especially when being resettled from countries with high risk for cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)872-878
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 17 2014

Fingerprint

Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Refugees
Early Detection of Cancer
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
refugee
cancer
community
Papanicolaou Test
Hearing
Central Asia
Neoplasms
Focus Groups
Developing Countries
Education
Mortality
Incidence
incidence
Health
mortality
Group

Keywords

  • Bhutanese
  • Cervical cancer
  • Nebraska
  • Screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices for Cervical Cancer Screening Among the Bhutanese Refugee Community in Omaha, Nebraska. / Haworth, Rebecca J.; Margalit, Ruth; Ross, Christine; Nepal, Tikka; Soliman, Amr S.

In: Journal of Community Health, Vol. 39, No. 5, 17.09.2014, p. 872-878.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Haworth, Rebecca J. ; Margalit, Ruth ; Ross, Christine ; Nepal, Tikka ; Soliman, Amr S. / Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices for Cervical Cancer Screening Among the Bhutanese Refugee Community in Omaha, Nebraska. In: Journal of Community Health. 2014 ; Vol. 39, No. 5. pp. 872-878.
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