Kinematic and ergonomic assessment of laparoendoscopic single-site surgical instruments during simulator training tasks

M. Susan Hallbeck, Bethany R Lowndes, Bernadette McCrory, Melissa M. Morrow, Kenton R. Kaufman, Chad A LaGrange

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) appears to be feasible and safe, instrument triangulation, tissue handling, and other bimanual tasks are difficult even for experienced surgeons. Novel technologies emerged to overcome LESS’ procedural and ergonomic difficulties of “tunnel vision” and “instrument clashing.” Surgeon kinematics, self-reported workload and upper body discomfort were used to compare straight, bent and two articulating instruments while performing two basic surgical tasks in a LESS simulator. All instruments resulted in bilateral elevation and rotation of the shoulders, excessive forearm motion and flexion and ulnar deviation of wrists. Surgeons’ adopted non-neutral upper extremity postures and performed excessive joint excursions to compensate for reduced freedom of movement at the single insertion site and to operate the instrument mechanisms. LESS’ cosmetic benefits continue to impact laparoscopic surgery and by enabling performance through improved instruments, ergonomic improvement for LESS can reduce negative impact on surgeon well-being and patient safety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)118-130
Number of pages13
JournalApplied Ergonomics
Volume62
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Fingerprint

Human Engineering
Ergonomics
Biomechanical Phenomena
Surgical Instruments
Surgery
surgery
ergonomics
Kinematics
Simulators
Plastic Surgery
Patient Safety
Workload
Wrist
Posture
Forearm
Upper Extremity
Laparoscopy
freedom of movement
cosmetics
Joints

Keywords

  • LESS
  • surgical instrument
  • workload

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Engineering (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Kinematic and ergonomic assessment of laparoendoscopic single-site surgical instruments during simulator training tasks. / Hallbeck, M. Susan; Lowndes, Bethany R; McCrory, Bernadette; Morrow, Melissa M.; Kaufman, Kenton R.; LaGrange, Chad A.

In: Applied Ergonomics, Vol. 62, 01.07.2017, p. 118-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hallbeck, M. Susan ; Lowndes, Bethany R ; McCrory, Bernadette ; Morrow, Melissa M. ; Kaufman, Kenton R. ; LaGrange, Chad A. / Kinematic and ergonomic assessment of laparoendoscopic single-site surgical instruments during simulator training tasks. In: Applied Ergonomics. 2017 ; Vol. 62. pp. 118-130.
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