Just how much did that wheelchair cost? Management of privacy boundaries by persons with disabilities

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Persons with physical disabilities were studied to determine how they communicate when they perceive ablebodied persons are expecting or demanding disclosure about their disabil­ity in new relationships. An interpretive analysis was performed on 350 pages of transcripted data from interviews with disabled adults. The results showed that disabled persons were able to describe the communication of ablebodied others and their attribu­tions when disclosure was demanded or expected. This study revealed communication strategies disabled persons use to manage disclosure. These strategies were discussed as regulating privacy boundaries, whereby disabled persons seek to be acknowledged as “per­sons first” by controlling dissemination of private information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-274
Number of pages21
JournalWestern Journal of Speech Communication
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1991

Fingerprint

Disabled persons
Wheelchairs
privacy
disability
human being
costs
management
Costs
Communication
physical disability
communication
attribution
Wheelchair
Privacy
Person
Disclosure
interview

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication

Cite this

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