It is better to be a fat ex-smoker than a thin smoker: Findings from the 1997-2004 national health interview survey-national death index linkage study

Mohammad Siahpush, Gopal K. Singh, Melissa K Tibbits, Courtney Pinard, Raees A. Shaikh, Amy Yaroch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective The aim of this research was to compare the risk of all-cause mortality and mortality from all cancers combined, lung cancer, respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus between normal-weight smokers and overweight or obese ex-smokers. Methods Data were from 1997 to 2004 National Health Interview Survey (with response rates ranging from 70% to 80%) which were linked to records in the National Death Index. Mortality follow-up was through 31 December 2006. The sample was limited to normal-weight smokers and overweight/obese ex-smokers 25 years of age and older (n=52 819). HR from Cox regression was computed to represent mortality effect. Results Results showed that in both women and men, normal-weight smokers, relative to overweight or obese ex-smokers, had a higher risk of mortality from all causes combined, all cancers combined, lung cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Among women, there was no difference in mortality risk from diabetes mellitus between normal-weight smokers and overweight or obese ex-smokers. Among men, there was some evidence that the risk of mortality was higher in obese ex-smokers than normal-weight smokers. Conclusions This article concludes that, overall, mortality risk is smaller in overweight or obese ex-smokers than normal-weight smokers. Smoking cessation interventions can tailor messages that highlight the greater reduction in mortality associated with quitting, compared with potential weight gain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)395-402
Number of pages8
JournalTobacco control
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2014

Fingerprint

Health Surveys
mortality
Fats
Interviews
death
Mortality
interview
health
Weights and Measures
Lung Neoplasms
cancer
Disease
chronic illness
Diabetes Mellitus
Cardiovascular Diseases
cause
Smoking Cessation
Weight Gain
smoking
regression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{101631f08d4e4cc790a74ad9e0fb9922,
title = "It is better to be a fat ex-smoker than a thin smoker: Findings from the 1997-2004 national health interview survey-national death index linkage study",
abstract = "Objective The aim of this research was to compare the risk of all-cause mortality and mortality from all cancers combined, lung cancer, respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus between normal-weight smokers and overweight or obese ex-smokers. Methods Data were from 1997 to 2004 National Health Interview Survey (with response rates ranging from 70{\%} to 80{\%}) which were linked to records in the National Death Index. Mortality follow-up was through 31 December 2006. The sample was limited to normal-weight smokers and overweight/obese ex-smokers 25 years of age and older (n=52 819). HR from Cox regression was computed to represent mortality effect. Results Results showed that in both women and men, normal-weight smokers, relative to overweight or obese ex-smokers, had a higher risk of mortality from all causes combined, all cancers combined, lung cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Among women, there was no difference in mortality risk from diabetes mellitus between normal-weight smokers and overweight or obese ex-smokers. Among men, there was some evidence that the risk of mortality was higher in obese ex-smokers than normal-weight smokers. Conclusions This article concludes that, overall, mortality risk is smaller in overweight or obese ex-smokers than normal-weight smokers. Smoking cessation interventions can tailor messages that highlight the greater reduction in mortality associated with quitting, compared with potential weight gain.",
author = "Mohammad Siahpush and Singh, {Gopal K.} and Tibbits, {Melissa K} and Courtney Pinard and Shaikh, {Raees A.} and Amy Yaroch",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2012-050912",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "395--402",
journal = "Tobacco Control",
issn = "0964-4563",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - It is better to be a fat ex-smoker than a thin smoker

T2 - Findings from the 1997-2004 national health interview survey-national death index linkage study

AU - Siahpush, Mohammad

AU - Singh, Gopal K.

AU - Tibbits, Melissa K

AU - Pinard, Courtney

AU - Shaikh, Raees A.

AU - Yaroch, Amy

PY - 2014/9

Y1 - 2014/9

N2 - Objective The aim of this research was to compare the risk of all-cause mortality and mortality from all cancers combined, lung cancer, respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus between normal-weight smokers and overweight or obese ex-smokers. Methods Data were from 1997 to 2004 National Health Interview Survey (with response rates ranging from 70% to 80%) which were linked to records in the National Death Index. Mortality follow-up was through 31 December 2006. The sample was limited to normal-weight smokers and overweight/obese ex-smokers 25 years of age and older (n=52 819). HR from Cox regression was computed to represent mortality effect. Results Results showed that in both women and men, normal-weight smokers, relative to overweight or obese ex-smokers, had a higher risk of mortality from all causes combined, all cancers combined, lung cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Among women, there was no difference in mortality risk from diabetes mellitus between normal-weight smokers and overweight or obese ex-smokers. Among men, there was some evidence that the risk of mortality was higher in obese ex-smokers than normal-weight smokers. Conclusions This article concludes that, overall, mortality risk is smaller in overweight or obese ex-smokers than normal-weight smokers. Smoking cessation interventions can tailor messages that highlight the greater reduction in mortality associated with quitting, compared with potential weight gain.

AB - Objective The aim of this research was to compare the risk of all-cause mortality and mortality from all cancers combined, lung cancer, respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus between normal-weight smokers and overweight or obese ex-smokers. Methods Data were from 1997 to 2004 National Health Interview Survey (with response rates ranging from 70% to 80%) which were linked to records in the National Death Index. Mortality follow-up was through 31 December 2006. The sample was limited to normal-weight smokers and overweight/obese ex-smokers 25 years of age and older (n=52 819). HR from Cox regression was computed to represent mortality effect. Results Results showed that in both women and men, normal-weight smokers, relative to overweight or obese ex-smokers, had a higher risk of mortality from all causes combined, all cancers combined, lung cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. Among women, there was no difference in mortality risk from diabetes mellitus between normal-weight smokers and overweight or obese ex-smokers. Among men, there was some evidence that the risk of mortality was higher in obese ex-smokers than normal-weight smokers. Conclusions This article concludes that, overall, mortality risk is smaller in overweight or obese ex-smokers than normal-weight smokers. Smoking cessation interventions can tailor messages that highlight the greater reduction in mortality associated with quitting, compared with potential weight gain.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84906269211&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84906269211&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2012-050912

DO - 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2012-050912

M3 - Article

C2 - 23574644

AN - SCOPUS:84906269211

VL - 23

SP - 395

EP - 402

JO - Tobacco Control

JF - Tobacco Control

SN - 0964-4563

IS - 5

ER -