Is weight loss possible in patients treated with thiazolidinediones? Experience with a low-calorie diet

Sunil Asnani, Byron C. Richard, Cyrus Desouza, Vivian Fonseca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Weight gain is a frequent side-effect of thiazolidinediones, possibly related to fluid retention and stimulation of pre-adipocyte differentiation. Methods: We report our experience with a low-calorie diet (800 cal, sodium content 1500 mmol/day) combined with behavior modification on eight patients treated with thiazolidinediones (six pioglitazone and two rosiglitazone). Results: All patients had reported previous weight gain following treatment with thiazolidinediones. All patients lost weight over 12 weeks in the program with their mean ± SD body weight falling from 270 ± 54 lbs (123 ± 25 kg) to 244 ± 61 lbs (111 ± 28 kg) (p < 0.01). The weight loss observed was no different from that observed in 16 age- and gender-matched patients with type 2 diabetes not treated with thiazolidinediones (from 263 ± 54 lbs (120 ± 25 kg) to 239 ± 52 lbs (109 ± 24 kg); p < 0.01). Glycemic control improved while reducing insulin treatment. Blood pressure control also improved and antihypertensive medications were decreased. The degree and time course of weight loss is no different from that in patients treated with other diabetic therapies and is associated with improved glycemic and blood pressure control. Conclusions: We conclude that a program of caloric restriction and behavior modification is effective in leading to weight loss in patients treated with thiazolidinediones. This effect is reassuring, since thiazolidinediones stimulate adipogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)609-613
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Medical Research and Opinion
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 30 2003

Fingerprint

Thiazolidinediones
Caloric Restriction
Weight Loss
Behavior Therapy
rosiglitazone
pioglitazone
Weight Gain
Blood Pressure
Adipogenesis
Adipocytes
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Antihypertensive Agents
Therapeutics
Sodium
Body Weight
Insulin
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Low-calorie diets
  • Obesity
  • Thiazolidinediones
  • Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
  • Weight loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Is weight loss possible in patients treated with thiazolidinediones? Experience with a low-calorie diet. / Asnani, Sunil; Richard, Byron C.; Desouza, Cyrus; Fonseca, Vivian.

In: Current Medical Research and Opinion, Vol. 19, No. 7, 30.10.2003, p. 609-613.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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