Is watch and wait still acceptable for patients with low-grade follicular lymphoma?

James Olen Armitage, Dan L. Longo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Follicular lymphoma (FL) represents more than 20% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas worldwide and approximately 30% of the non-Hodgkin lymphomas diagnosed in the United States. Although occasionally localized at the time of diagnosis, most patients have disseminated disease. However, patients are frequently asymptomatic, and this, in combination with a long median survival, led to the initial studies of observing asymptomatic patients without initial therapy, ie, "watch and wait." Since the initial report of watch and wait as a treatment strategy for patients with low-grade FL, our understanding of the biology of the disease has advanced; multiple active new agents have been introduced into practice, and the survival of patients with low-grade FL has improved. Given these changes, is watch and wait still an acceptable treatment recommendation for a newly diagnosed patient with low-grade FL? (Blood. 2016;127(23):2804-2808).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2804-2808
Number of pages5
JournalBlood
Volume127
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 9 2016

Fingerprint

Follicular Lymphoma
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Watches
Blood
Survival
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Immunology
  • Hematology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Is watch and wait still acceptable for patients with low-grade follicular lymphoma? / Armitage, James Olen; Longo, Dan L.

In: Blood, Vol. 127, No. 23, 09.06.2016, p. 2804-2808.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{8d0983e69a6248448c78664395f9e497,
title = "Is watch and wait still acceptable for patients with low-grade follicular lymphoma?",
abstract = "Follicular lymphoma (FL) represents more than 20{\%} of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas worldwide and approximately 30{\%} of the non-Hodgkin lymphomas diagnosed in the United States. Although occasionally localized at the time of diagnosis, most patients have disseminated disease. However, patients are frequently asymptomatic, and this, in combination with a long median survival, led to the initial studies of observing asymptomatic patients without initial therapy, ie, {"}watch and wait.{"} Since the initial report of watch and wait as a treatment strategy for patients with low-grade FL, our understanding of the biology of the disease has advanced; multiple active new agents have been introduced into practice, and the survival of patients with low-grade FL has improved. Given these changes, is watch and wait still an acceptable treatment recommendation for a newly diagnosed patient with low-grade FL? (Blood. 2016;127(23):2804-2808).",
author = "Armitage, {James Olen} and Longo, {Dan L.}",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "9",
doi = "10.1182/blood-2015-11-632745",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "127",
pages = "2804--2808",
journal = "Blood",
issn = "0006-4971",
publisher = "American Society of Hematology",
number = "23",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is watch and wait still acceptable for patients with low-grade follicular lymphoma?

AU - Armitage, James Olen

AU - Longo, Dan L.

PY - 2016/6/9

Y1 - 2016/6/9

N2 - Follicular lymphoma (FL) represents more than 20% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas worldwide and approximately 30% of the non-Hodgkin lymphomas diagnosed in the United States. Although occasionally localized at the time of diagnosis, most patients have disseminated disease. However, patients are frequently asymptomatic, and this, in combination with a long median survival, led to the initial studies of observing asymptomatic patients without initial therapy, ie, "watch and wait." Since the initial report of watch and wait as a treatment strategy for patients with low-grade FL, our understanding of the biology of the disease has advanced; multiple active new agents have been introduced into practice, and the survival of patients with low-grade FL has improved. Given these changes, is watch and wait still an acceptable treatment recommendation for a newly diagnosed patient with low-grade FL? (Blood. 2016;127(23):2804-2808).

AB - Follicular lymphoma (FL) represents more than 20% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas worldwide and approximately 30% of the non-Hodgkin lymphomas diagnosed in the United States. Although occasionally localized at the time of diagnosis, most patients have disseminated disease. However, patients are frequently asymptomatic, and this, in combination with a long median survival, led to the initial studies of observing asymptomatic patients without initial therapy, ie, "watch and wait." Since the initial report of watch and wait as a treatment strategy for patients with low-grade FL, our understanding of the biology of the disease has advanced; multiple active new agents have been introduced into practice, and the survival of patients with low-grade FL has improved. Given these changes, is watch and wait still an acceptable treatment recommendation for a newly diagnosed patient with low-grade FL? (Blood. 2016;127(23):2804-2808).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84974602984&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84974602984&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1182/blood-2015-11-632745

DO - 10.1182/blood-2015-11-632745

M3 - Article

C2 - 26994147

AN - SCOPUS:84974602984

VL - 127

SP - 2804

EP - 2808

JO - Blood

JF - Blood

SN - 0006-4971

IS - 23

ER -