Is there a serotonin-induced hypertensive coronary chemoreflux in the nonhuman primate?

K. G. Cornish, Irving H Zucker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the nature of the serotonin-induced coronary chemoreflex in the conscious monkey. Ten chronically prepared and four acute monkeys were used in this study. Five chronically prepared animals had catheters in the left atrium, ascending aorta, descending aorta, and, bilaterally in the common carotid arteries. In addition, Silastic catheters were placed next to both vagi to permit vagal block with 2% lidocaine. Serotonin was injected (12-200 μg/kg) into the left atrium, ascending aorta, descending aorta, or, bilaterally, into the carotid arteries with blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory movements were recorded. Injections of serotonin were associated with hypertension and bradycardia followed by tachycarda, all of which were preceded by a cough response. Atropine blocked the bradycardia, whereas atropine and phentolamine eliminated the cardiovascular components of the reflex. Vagal blockade eliminated the bradycardia but otherwise did not alter the response to left atrial serotonin. Three monkeys were prepared with aortic and left atrial catheters. Subsequently, they were subjected to sinoaortic deafferentiation. Serotonin injected into these animals did not alter blood pressure or respiration. The results of this study show that serotonin injected into the left atrium of the conscious monkey produces respiratory and cardiovascular alterations by its effect on aortic and carotid chemoreceptors, and that there is no coronary chemoreflex in the conscious monkey.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)312-318
Number of pages7
JournalCirculation Research
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

Fingerprint

Primates
Serotonin
Haplorhini
Bradycardia
Heart Atria
Catheters
Thoracic Aorta
Atropine
Aorta
Blood Pressure
Phentolamine
Common Carotid Artery
Lidocaine
Carotid Arteries
Cough
Reflex
Respiration
Heart Rate
Hypertension
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Is there a serotonin-induced hypertensive coronary chemoreflux in the nonhuman primate? / Cornish, K. G.; Zucker, Irving H.

In: Circulation Research, Vol. 52, No. 3, 01.01.1983, p. 312-318.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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