Intimate Partner Violence and Subsequent Depression: Examining the Roles of Neighborhood Supportive Mechanisms

Emily M Steiner, Gillian M. Pinchevsky, Michael L. Benson, Dana L. Radatz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the direct effects of neighborhood supportive mechanisms (e.g., collective efficacy, social cohesion, social networks) on depressive symptoms among females as well as their moderating effects on the impact of IPV on subsequent depressive symptoms. A multilevel, multivariate Rasch model was used with data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to assess the existence of IPV and later susceptibility of depressive symptoms among 2959 adult females in 80 neighborhoods. Results indicate that neighborhood collective efficacy, social cohesion, social interactions, and the number of friends and family in the neighborhood reduce the likelihood that females experience depressive symptoms. However, living in areas with high proportions of friends and relatives exacerbates the impact of IPV on females’ subsequent depressive symptoms. The findings indicate that neighborhood supportive mechanisms impact interpersonal outcomes in both direct and moderating ways, although direct effects were more pronounced for depression than moderating effects. Future research should continue to examine the positive and potentially mitigating influences of neighborhoods in order to better understand for whom and under which circumstances violent relationships and mental health are influenced by contextual factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)342-356
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Journal of Community Psychology
Volume56
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 21 2015

Fingerprint

Depression
violence
social cohesion
Human Development
Interpersonal Relations
Intimate Partner Violence
Social Support
Mental Health
social network
mental health
interaction
experience

Keywords

  • Collective efficacy
  • Depression
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Neighborhoods
  • Protective factors
  • Social ties

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Intimate Partner Violence and Subsequent Depression : Examining the Roles of Neighborhood Supportive Mechanisms. / Steiner, Emily M; Pinchevsky, Gillian M.; Benson, Michael L.; Radatz, Dana L.

In: American Journal of Community Psychology, Vol. 56, No. 3-4, 21.09.2015, p. 342-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Steiner, Emily M ; Pinchevsky, Gillian M. ; Benson, Michael L. ; Radatz, Dana L. / Intimate Partner Violence and Subsequent Depression : Examining the Roles of Neighborhood Supportive Mechanisms. In: American Journal of Community Psychology. 2015 ; Vol. 56, No. 3-4. pp. 342-356.
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