Intervention Using Talking Word Processing Software: An Aphasia Case Study

Julia M. King, Karen Hux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An adult with mild aphasia (Mr. C) participated in an 8-week intervention program addressing written language. This case study reports the impact of using a talKing word processing program on the frequency of errors in written language. The examiner tallied word-level substitution, addition, omission, and spelling errors for preintervention, intervention, and postintervention written language samples. An immediate decrease in overall error rate occurred when Mr. C used the talking output feature to edit his written language. The frequency of errors also decreased from preintervention to postintervention samples written without the assistance of computerized spoken feedback. Subjective ratings by 20 adults revealed a significant change in overall writing quality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-192
Number of pages6
JournalAugmentative and Alternative Communication
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1995

Fingerprint

Word Processing
Aphasia
Language
Software

Keywords

  • aphasia
  • augmentative and alternative communication (AAC)
  • computers
  • speech synthesis
  • writing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Intervention Using Talking Word Processing Software : An Aphasia Case Study. / King, Julia M.; Hux, Karen.

In: Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Vol. 11, No. 3, 01.1995, p. 187-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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