Integrated Primary Care for Children in Rural Communities: An Examination of Patient Attendance at Collaborative Behavioral Health Services

Rachel J. Valleley, Stacy Kosse, Ariadne Schemm, Nancy Foster, Jodi Polaha, Joseph H. Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many barriers have been proposed to explain why rural residents do not receive adequate behavioral health services even though the need for such services is great. One solution proposed to address the need in rural settings is to offer these services within primary care. This study was designed to examine child attendance rates at integrated behavioral health clinics (BHCs) in rural primary care offices. Referral forms for all children recommended to attend three BHCs were reviewed by research assistants. Attendance at appointment, length of time on waiting list, severity of the problem, referral reasons, and parent stress were coded. Across the three BHCs, nearly 88% of children referred were scheduled for an initial appointment, and 81% of children referred for behavioral health services attended the initial appointment. Follow through for children referred by their primary care physician to a colocated behavioral health specialist in rural settings was much higher than found in other studies. These data suggest that in rural settings integrated care may increase access to and continuity of care for a population that is often neglected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)323-332
Number of pages10
JournalFamilies, Systems and Health
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

Fingerprint

Rural Population
Health Services
Primary Health Care
Appointments and Schedules
Health
Referral and Consultation
Continuity of Patient Care
Waiting Lists
Health Services Needs and Demand
Primary Care Physicians
Research
Population

Keywords

  • attendance
  • behavioral health
  • children
  • integrated care
  • rural

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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