Integrated management of a finite water supply in the desert

Daniel Wendell, Steven D Shultz, Aditya Tyagi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Fort Irwin is located in California's Mojave Desert, adjacent to Death Valley, and receives about five inches of rain per year. Local water supply comes from three separate groundwater basins that have no significant natural recharge and therefore provide a finite supply of water. The base is an important Army training facility and extending the life of water supplies is of critical importance. This work was undertaken to maximize the "lifespan" of local water supplies, minimize costs, and avoid adverse impacts to the extent possible. To meet the needs of this project, the entire water cycle of the area was evaluated in an integrated and quantitative manner, including: modeling local groundwater supplies; evaluating potential development of remote water supplies and associated costs; conducting an end-use water demand and conservation analysis; developing a recycled water irrigation program; implementing an indirect wastewater reuse (i.e., recharge) program; developing an operations program designed to mitigate adverse impacts such as land subsidence; and assessing cost, power consumption, and greenhouse gas emissions from the various alternatives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009
Subtitle of host publicationGreat Rivers
Pages4956-4964
Number of pages9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 26 2009
EventWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers - Kansas City, MO, United States
Duration: May 17 2009May 21 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers
Volume342

Conference

ConferenceWorld Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers
CountryUnited States
CityKansas City, MO
Period5/17/095/21/09

Fingerprint

desert
water supply
recharge
cost
groundwater
water demand
water
greenhouse gas
subsidence
irrigation
valley
wastewater
integrated management
basin
modeling
programme

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Wendell, D., Shultz, S. D., & Tyagi, A. (2009). Integrated management of a finite water supply in the desert. In Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers (pp. 4956-4964). (Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers; Vol. 342). https://doi.org/10.1061/41036(342)500

Integrated management of a finite water supply in the desert. / Wendell, Daniel; Shultz, Steven D; Tyagi, Aditya.

Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers. 2009. p. 4956-4964 (Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers; Vol. 342).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Wendell, D, Shultz, SD & Tyagi, A 2009, Integrated management of a finite water supply in the desert. in Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers. Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers, vol. 342, pp. 4956-4964, World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers, Kansas City, MO, United States, 5/17/09. https://doi.org/10.1061/41036(342)500
Wendell D, Shultz SD, Tyagi A. Integrated management of a finite water supply in the desert. In Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers. 2009. p. 4956-4964. (Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers). https://doi.org/10.1061/41036(342)500
Wendell, Daniel ; Shultz, Steven D ; Tyagi, Aditya. / Integrated management of a finite water supply in the desert. Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers. 2009. pp. 4956-4964 (Proceedings of World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009 - World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2009: Great Rivers).
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