Integrated capture and spectroscopic detection of viruses

Crystal A. Vargas, Allison A. Wilhelm, Jeremy Williams, Pierre Lucas, Kelly A. Reynolds, Mark Riley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The goal of this work is to develop an online monitoring scheme for detection of viruses in flowing drinking water. The approach applies an electrodeposition process that is similar to the use of charged membrane filters previously employed for collection of viruses from aqueous samples. In the present approach, charged materials are driven onto a robust optical sensing element which has high transparency to infrared light. A spectroscopic measurement is performed using the evanescent wave that penetrates no more than 1 μm from the surface of an infrared optical element in an attenuated total reflectance measurement scheme. The infrared measurement provides quantitative information on the amount and identity of material deposited from the water. Initial studies of this sensing scheme used proteins reversibly electrodeposited onto germanium chips. The results of those studies were applied to design a method for collection of viruses onto an attenuated total reflectance crystal. Spectral signatures can be discriminated between three types of protein and two viruses. There is the potential to remove deposited material by reversing the voltage polarity. This work demonstrates a novel and practical scheme for detection of viruses in water systems with potential application to nearcontinual, automated monitoring of municipal drinking water.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6431-6440
Number of pages10
JournalApplied and environmental microbiology
Volume75
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 19 2009

Fingerprint

virus
Viruses
viruses
Drinking Water
reflectance
drinking water
information transparency
germanium
Electroplating
Germanium
protein
Water
monitoring
water
transparency
crystals
Proteins
proteins
detection
crystal

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Vargas, C. A., Wilhelm, A. A., Williams, J., Lucas, P., Reynolds, K. A., & Riley, M. (2009). Integrated capture and spectroscopic detection of viruses. Applied and environmental microbiology, 75(20), 6431-6440. https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02036-08

Integrated capture and spectroscopic detection of viruses. / Vargas, Crystal A.; Wilhelm, Allison A.; Williams, Jeremy; Lucas, Pierre; Reynolds, Kelly A.; Riley, Mark.

In: Applied and environmental microbiology, Vol. 75, No. 20, 19.10.2009, p. 6431-6440.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vargas, CA, Wilhelm, AA, Williams, J, Lucas, P, Reynolds, KA & Riley, M 2009, 'Integrated capture and spectroscopic detection of viruses', Applied and environmental microbiology, vol. 75, no. 20, pp. 6431-6440. https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02036-08
Vargas, Crystal A. ; Wilhelm, Allison A. ; Williams, Jeremy ; Lucas, Pierre ; Reynolds, Kelly A. ; Riley, Mark. / Integrated capture and spectroscopic detection of viruses. In: Applied and environmental microbiology. 2009 ; Vol. 75, No. 20. pp. 6431-6440.
@article{94cc314fd0b74bc3b251ce950a27f745,
title = "Integrated capture and spectroscopic detection of viruses",
abstract = "The goal of this work is to develop an online monitoring scheme for detection of viruses in flowing drinking water. The approach applies an electrodeposition process that is similar to the use of charged membrane filters previously employed for collection of viruses from aqueous samples. In the present approach, charged materials are driven onto a robust optical sensing element which has high transparency to infrared light. A spectroscopic measurement is performed using the evanescent wave that penetrates no more than 1 μm from the surface of an infrared optical element in an attenuated total reflectance measurement scheme. The infrared measurement provides quantitative information on the amount and identity of material deposited from the water. Initial studies of this sensing scheme used proteins reversibly electrodeposited onto germanium chips. The results of those studies were applied to design a method for collection of viruses onto an attenuated total reflectance crystal. Spectral signatures can be discriminated between three types of protein and two viruses. There is the potential to remove deposited material by reversing the voltage polarity. This work demonstrates a novel and practical scheme for detection of viruses in water systems with potential application to nearcontinual, automated monitoring of municipal drinking water.",
author = "Vargas, {Crystal A.} and Wilhelm, {Allison A.} and Jeremy Williams and Pierre Lucas and Reynolds, {Kelly A.} and Mark Riley",
year = "2009",
month = "10",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1128/AEM.02036-08",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "75",
pages = "6431--6440",
journal = "Applied and Environmental Microbiology",
issn = "0099-2240",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "20",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Integrated capture and spectroscopic detection of viruses

AU - Vargas, Crystal A.

AU - Wilhelm, Allison A.

AU - Williams, Jeremy

AU - Lucas, Pierre

AU - Reynolds, Kelly A.

AU - Riley, Mark

PY - 2009/10/19

Y1 - 2009/10/19

N2 - The goal of this work is to develop an online monitoring scheme for detection of viruses in flowing drinking water. The approach applies an electrodeposition process that is similar to the use of charged membrane filters previously employed for collection of viruses from aqueous samples. In the present approach, charged materials are driven onto a robust optical sensing element which has high transparency to infrared light. A spectroscopic measurement is performed using the evanescent wave that penetrates no more than 1 μm from the surface of an infrared optical element in an attenuated total reflectance measurement scheme. The infrared measurement provides quantitative information on the amount and identity of material deposited from the water. Initial studies of this sensing scheme used proteins reversibly electrodeposited onto germanium chips. The results of those studies were applied to design a method for collection of viruses onto an attenuated total reflectance crystal. Spectral signatures can be discriminated between three types of protein and two viruses. There is the potential to remove deposited material by reversing the voltage polarity. This work demonstrates a novel and practical scheme for detection of viruses in water systems with potential application to nearcontinual, automated monitoring of municipal drinking water.

AB - The goal of this work is to develop an online monitoring scheme for detection of viruses in flowing drinking water. The approach applies an electrodeposition process that is similar to the use of charged membrane filters previously employed for collection of viruses from aqueous samples. In the present approach, charged materials are driven onto a robust optical sensing element which has high transparency to infrared light. A spectroscopic measurement is performed using the evanescent wave that penetrates no more than 1 μm from the surface of an infrared optical element in an attenuated total reflectance measurement scheme. The infrared measurement provides quantitative information on the amount and identity of material deposited from the water. Initial studies of this sensing scheme used proteins reversibly electrodeposited onto germanium chips. The results of those studies were applied to design a method for collection of viruses onto an attenuated total reflectance crystal. Spectral signatures can be discriminated between three types of protein and two viruses. There is the potential to remove deposited material by reversing the voltage polarity. This work demonstrates a novel and practical scheme for detection of viruses in water systems with potential application to nearcontinual, automated monitoring of municipal drinking water.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=70349907091&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=70349907091&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/AEM.02036-08

DO - 10.1128/AEM.02036-08

M3 - Article

VL - 75

SP - 6431

EP - 6440

JO - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

JF - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

SN - 0099-2240

IS - 20

ER -