Insulin inhibition of the proteasome is dependent on degradation of insulin by insulin-degrading enzyme

Robert G Bennett, J. Fawcett, M. C. Kruer, W. C. Duckworth, Frederick G Hamel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A consequence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is the loss of lean muscle mass as a result of accelerated proteolysis by the proteasome. Insulin inhibition of proteasomal activity requires interaction with insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), but it is unclear if proteasome inhibition is dependent merely on insulin-IDE binding or if degradation of insulin by IDE is required. To test the hypothesis that degradation by IDE is required for proteasome inhibition, a panel of insulin analogues with variable susceptibility to degradation by IDE binding was used to assess effects on the proteasome. The analogues used were [LysB28, ProB29]-insulin (lispro), [AspB10]-insulin (AspB10) and [GluB4, GlnB16, PheB17]-insulin (EQF). Lispro was as effective as insulin at inhibition of degradation of iodine-125 (125I)-labeled insulin, but AspB10 and EQF were somewhat more effective. All agents inhibited cross-linking of 125I-insulin to IDE, suggesting that all were capable of IDE binding. In contrast, although insulin and lispro were readily degraded by IDE, AspB10 was degraded more slowly, and EQF degradation was undetectable. Both insulin and lispro inhibited the proteasome, but AspB10 was less effective, and EQF had little effect. In summary, despite effective IDE binding, EQF was poorly degraded by IDE, and was ineffective at proteasome inhibition. These data suggest that insulin inhibition of proteasome activity is dependent on degradation by IDE. The mechanism of proteasome inhibition may be the generation of inhibitory fragments of insulin, or by displacement of IDE from the proteasome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-405
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Endocrinology
Volume177
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003

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Insulysin
Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
Insulin
Insulin Lispro
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Iodine
Proteolysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Insulin inhibition of the proteasome is dependent on degradation of insulin by insulin-degrading enzyme. / Bennett, Robert G; Fawcett, J.; Kruer, M. C.; Duckworth, W. C.; Hamel, Frederick G.

In: Journal of Endocrinology, Vol. 177, No. 3, 01.06.2003, p. 399-405.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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